...rules, statutes, decrees, and regulations that govern social behaviour. The dignified men and women who practise it daily do so for the sake of maintaining lawfulness and ensuring justice is served.
Some of the most popular subfields within Law include European or International Law, Criminal, Civil, Public or Private Law, and Patent & Intellectual Law.
Law is one of the oldest and most revered disciplines throughout history, so the expectations of law students are high, but so are the rewards. Whether you decide to become a judge, a defence attorney, a prosecutor, or focus on working within a specific organisation or company, you will be expected to have a high level of knowledge, a great sense of justice, a vast vocabulary, and excellent negotiation and communication skills. You'll need to back them up with a great memory and strong analytical thinking.
Courses offered by Law degrees will initially focus on national and international frameworks. Other modules you might study are contract law, tort law, property law, criminal law and human right law. They will be followed by legal training, where you'll have the opportunity to practise what you've learned. While studying a law degree, you will also develop and enhance your public-speaking skills and the ability to form arguments and support them with relevant facts. You can use principles from rhetorical discourse to significantly improve this ability.The world needs more law practitioners. You can be one of the people who defend the truth and make sure our society is safer and fairer, and that’s something you should be proud of.
A Bachelor's or Master's in Law will allow you to find a successful career as a solicitor, barrister, judge, detective, licensed conveyancer, advice worker, mediator, and others.

International law deals with relations between nations and states also known as law of nations, and is split into public international law, private international law and supranational law. International law deals with the legal interactions between nations, companies, or governments, assuring their proper rights.
Masters of international law offer many specialisations such as: international economic law, international security law, international criminal law, international environmental law, diplomatic law, international human rights law, etc.
Students of international law will be prepared to address topics such as: state elements of liability for internationally wrongful conduct, state responsibility for dangerous activities, law treaties and negotiation practices, means of settling international economic disputes.
Bachelors in international law may prepare graduates for future government positions as well as to work in departments that address issues such as international relations, European integration and legal reconciliation. Other career paths include private law firms that deal with international business transactions, international and non-profit organisations as well as intergovernmental organisations.

Criminal law, or penal law, is the body of law that regulates and punishes acts considered undesirable to the state. Examples of crimes include theft, assault, and robbery, trafficking in controlled substances, murder or treason. The purpose of penal law is to maintain a state of order in society by confining lawbreakers, and preventing them and others from violating the well-being of citizens.
Criminal law is different from the civil rights law in that the latter focuses on disputes between private parties and seeks to compensate the victim. Disciplines related to criminal law are criminology, accounting forensics, forensic psychology, international criminal law, environmental law, and military law.
Universities offer studies in criminal law as independent programmes, under Bachelor of Laws (LLB) or Master of Laws (LLM) professional degrees. Students gain general theoretical knowledge of penal law such as criminal justice, global crime problems and human rights. They gain an in-depth knowledge of aspects related to homicide, mentally disordered offenders, the death penalty, legal responses to terrorism, and many more.
Careers in criminal law include criminalist and criminologist, public interest lawyer, judge and magistrate, forensic psychologist, fraud investigator, detective, probation officer, or crime laboratory analyst. Professional practice in various work places such as law firms, private business, government, and public interest organisations.

Civil law is the legal system that focuses on relations between individuals or organizations and the consequences of these relations. This branch of law focuses on finding solutions and compensations for victims of actions that do not follow the law of the society. Civil law mostly applies to accidents, contracts, wills, properties and other matters that often include disputes, the necessity of an agreement or an affected part.
Civil law is part of private law, along with labour, commercial, corporate and compensation law. Each of these specializations follows particular codes. A Bachelor’s degree in civil and private law (BCL) allows students to specialize in one of the fields mentioned above and earn career prospects in the government, law firms or corporations or even in a private practice.
A graduate with a Master’s degree in civil and private law can work as a solicitor who is hired to guard the interests of his or her clients. This field is financially rewarding, but it involves good research as well as interview skills.

Public law includes constitutional, administrative, procedural, tax and criminal law and sometimes also deals with situations between individuals or companies, if the issue affects the state. Constitutional law applies on relations between individuals and any of the state’s branches – the executive, the legislative and the judiciary.
Administrative law covers the agencies of the government, while procedural law focuses on how a trial or a legal action is taking place. Tax law looks into financial issues. Criminal law involves crimes committed by individuals and leads to sanctions that are meant to protect the society. The fields mentioned above can be studied in a Master’s degree in public law.
Students have the option to earn their Bachelor’s degree in public law and then continue their studies with a programme that will also bring them a specialization. After graduation, they have career prospects in public law as solicitors or lawyers and hold a stable job in a balanced environment, such as the state legal system.

Business Law is a subject where you will learn about the laws that are used in transactions between people and commercial matters.
There are two areas of business law. One deals with the regulation of organisations through laws of partnership, company, bankruptcy and agency. The other one regulates commercial exchanges through laws of contract. This means you will handle legal issues, such as contracts, litigations, transactions, intellectual property, fraud, illegal activities, ethical business practices, etc.
During your studies, you can choose to specialise in a certain field, such as International Business Law, European Business Law, and others. You will learn about law-making, e-commerce, business economics and other aspects. Additionally, you’ll discover how to advise people who want to start a business and help them with understanding the legal aspects of hiring and firing people. You’ll also discover more about the tax system, how it works and how to minimise taxes.
The focus will be on developing various skills, ranging from writing, communication, to negotiation and presentation. A great advantage of studying Business Law studies is the opportunity to practise these skills on real case studies.
A Bachelor's or Master's in Business Law can help you become a successful business lawyer, paralegal, finance analyst, risk analyst, loan officer, or corporate counsel

Legal studies is an interdisciplinary field that deals with the mutual influence between law and society. It provides a general understanding legal systems, how regulations are formed and social actors involved in the legal process. Legal studies involve perspectives belonging to subjects including political science, economics, history, sociology, international relations and philosophy. Law students learn how to address important issues such as the relationship between citizens and the state, individual liberty and privacy, social equality, or justice in the distribution of resources.
Students pursuing a career in legal studies many choose between different types of law qualifications including vocational certificates, LLBs or BAs in Law, to Masters of Law (LLM), or research doctorates. Bachelors and Masters in legal studies focus on commercial law, environmental law, government and law, legal theory, international law or criminology and criminal justice. Law professionals make use of in-depth knowledge of legal principles, and possess abilities such as: language and communication skills, analytic reasoning, critical thinking and respect for ethical conduct. Extracurricular activities and community service work enhance the more practical side of legal training.
Legal studies provide a background for graduate work in administration of justice, business, legal studies, and law as well as work in law-related fields like insurance, social security, and social services. Graduates develop legal careers as arbitrators, mediators, lawyers, judges and magistrates, legal secretaries, legal consultants, investigators, etc.

The Master of Laws (LL.M.) is an internationally recognised postgraduate degree generally acquired after one year of full-time legal studies. Law students and professionals typically pursue a LL.M. to deepen their legal expertise and to enhance their career prospects. To be considered for an LL.M. degree, most universities require a professional degree in law, while others accept first degrees in related areas. An alternative to the Master of Laws is the Graduate Diploma in Law, offering more flexible learning objectives.
Academic institutions offer either generalist LL.M. degrees or specialised programmes in various legal fields. Specialist areas include international and European public law, environmental law, corporate and commercial law, taxation, human rights and social justice, criminal justice and criminology, among others. Most LL.M. programmes blend coursework and research, group tasks, seminars and real case studies. Some programmes are rather research-oriented requiring a written thesis.
Law students will need to prove their analytical, reasoning and critical judgement skills, but they will also make use of persuasive communication abilities. Attention to detail and the capacity to manage substantial amounts of information will prove essential for their career success.
Most LL.M. graduates profess as lawyers in the business sector, for governmental institutions or for a non-profit organisation. Other work opportunities include careers as law professors, judges, diplomats, politicians, legal counsellor, mediator and many more.


Journalism Media is a subject that deals with researching events, creating accurate reports and then distributing the information to the public through various communication channels. Journalism is important because the world needs people who can look at a situation objectively, determine the authenticity of every story, and discover the truth behind it.
Whether it is through traditional media (newspapers, magazines, radio, television) or digital/new media (social media, blogs, vlogs, and others), studying Journalism & Media will allow you to keep people informed and debate aspects that are essential for the wellbeing of our society.
At a basic level, Journalism & Media encompasses subdisciplines that focus on how the public gains access to information. Be it through Journalism, Media Management, Public Relations, or Translation & Interpreting, Journalism students learn to choose their words carefully and understand their full impact.
Journalism courses deliver essential knowledge for working in media organisations, such as excellent written and spoken communication skills, critical thinking, research, as well as an ethical and responsible attitude.
Some of the specialisations in Journalism & Media include Broadcast Journalism, Digital Journalism, Enterprise Journalism, Political Journalism, Journalism Design and Graphics, Science and Environmental Journalism, and Public Relations and Advertising.
After graduating, you'll find jobs as a: broadcast journalist, editorial assistant, magazine journalist, writer, web content manager, and publishing copy-editor or proofreader. A Bachelor's or Master's in Journalism & Media also allows you to work as a digital copywriter, multimedia specialist, translator, or public relations officer.

Journalism is the practice of gathering information about events, issues and trends and distributing them as news to large audiences. The information is delivered through various mass-media including print, broadcast and the online environment. Journalism involves aspects from communication sciences, media studies, humanities and social sciences. It also deals with many ethical and deontological challenges in the every-day practice.
Journalists act as mediators between various sources of information and a target audience. They investigate facts, assess the collected information and distribute it through newspapers, magazines, television and blogs, as well as social and mobile media. Journalists need to have a good knowledge of mass communication methods and technical devices, a broad understating of social and economic contexts and objective criteria for disseminating information.
As universities offer various concentrations in journalism, students can choose tracks in broadcasting, news reporting and writing, journalism design and graphics, photojournalism, science and environmental journalism, and many more. Courses have a high vocational component, therefore they focus less on theoretical lectures and more on the development of professional skills through field practice and studio work.
Specialisations for graduates include investigative journalism, tabloid, broadcast, advocacy journalism, or editorial.
Example careers in journalism include: reporter, technical writer, publisher, content producer, news presenter, freelancers, media managers and book editors.

Media management is an area of business administration that deals with organising and supervising teams of media professionals, various mass communication channels and technologies, media and entertainment productions, and more. Media managers make use of organisation skills, marketing strategies, media economic understanding, and the knowledge of different software tools utilised in media productions.
Media colleges and business schools usually offer study programmes in media management at graduate levels, while some offer concentration tracks in media management for business administration degrees. Courses generally focus on studying general management methods, the functioning of different types of media, communication and competitive strategies, marketing models, corporate responsibility, intellectual property law, and more.
Graduates will be prepared for a range of management careers within the media sector or across similar disciplines. Professionals work in production, branding advertising, marketing and business management for radio, print, TV or new media, and media administration for commercial or non-profit organisations, to name a few. Career prospects include titles of assistant marketing manager, media planner, communication specialist, advertising manager, editor in chief, digital global development manager, social media specialist, among others.

Media studies is a broad field of studies that deals with the history, content and impact of various collective communication methods and tools, with a focus on mass media. The discipline places a great focus on the theoretical and cultural approach towards communication sciences, mass communication and communication studies. Media studies also use concepts and techniques from other disciplines such as sociology, anthropology, psychology, politics, economics, or philosophy. Mass media refers to the applied study of different practices and technology used to facilitate the communication of information for large audiences.
Theoretical studies in mass media emphasise topics such as the history of mass media and its social impact, with an in-depth understanding of communication theory and an analytical approach to the development of new media. Many schools offer joint degrees, combining media with other subjects. Vocational courses focus more on teaching practical and specialised skills such as efficient writing, editing techniques and the process of production in specific areas of the media.
Career prospects for graduates in media studies and mass media include roles such as journalist, media planner, broadcast producer, market researcher, social media manager, public relations consultant, copywriter, and others.

Public relations, or PR, is the communication science that deals with delivering information from an organisation or public figure to a specific audience. PR specialists promote the goods, services or image of their clients, which include public figures, business and industrial enterprises, governmental bodies or non-profit organisations. They work together with mass media professionals by writing and distributing press releases or by organising and managing press conferences to generate publicity. PR professionals can also maintain direct contact with the public through social media platforms and blogs.
Communication schools and departments offer individual degrees in public relations or other study programmes that combine public relations with other disciplines. Examples include media and public relations, corporate communication, PR management, or marketing.
Students acquire versatile knowledge in diplomatic communication and public speaking, negotiation, writing and organisational skills and learn to build PR and communication campaigns. Students will also discuss various ethical issues on real-case examples and investigate various crisis management strategies.
Career prospects for PR Master's graduates include press secretaries, publicists, campaign managers, event organisers, media planners, to name a few. They can be employed by corporations, governmental agencies, PR consultancy firms, healthcare organisations, charities, public figures; or may work as free-lancers.

Translation and interpreting involves converting the meaning of written or spoken content from one language to another. While translation deals with written materials, interpreting refers to oral translation or through sign language. Professionals in the field have advanced knowledge of the languages used, but they also need to understand properly the subject matter of the translation.
Translators work with various documents including literary texts, web copy, reports, legal papers, instructional guides, brochures and more. Interpreters facilitate communication in different contexts such as international conferences and events, business meetings, video seminars, or criminal justice proceedings.
Interpreting and translation relates to disciplines such as language studies, linguistics, comparative literature and cultural studies. Professionals often have to work with other diverse areas, depending on the subject area of the material they are required to translate or interpret.
Universities usually offer a study programmes focusing on one central language paired with English. There are also various specialisations within the field including literary translation, conference and community interpreting, intercultural service in healthcare, multilingual organisational communication or interpreting and translation for international business.
Example roles for future translators and interpreters include editors and proof-writers, language analysts, and also translators and interpreters in specific fields such as business, law, medicine or public services.


... creativity, design principles, theories, methods and tools in order to create a more beautiful and functional world.
People who work in Arts, Design & Architecture develop projects, plans, designs and concepts for everything, from buildings, monuments, clothes, and devices to intuitive graphical interfaces and easy-to-use web pages. They are also creators of fabulous art, including paintings, music, theatre plays, dances, and many other wonderful expressions of beauty and imagination.
Some of the main disciplines within Arts, Design & Architecture are Art History, Graphic Design, Landscape Architecture, Music, Visual Arts, etc.
If you choose to focus on Architecture, you will learn everything there is to know about creating the perfect design for a new building or even an entire city. Courses will focus on fundamental architecture elements, on safety and materials, environmental impact, as well as lighting, textures, and how to create the perfect contrast between materials and colours. It’s not an easy job, as it also involves principles from physics and mathematics, but designing someone’s dream house or a cityscape is a very rewarding job.
Studying Graphic Design will focus on teaching you how to use images, text and colours to communicate messages efficiently. To do that, classes will present basic design principles, elements, and rules.
If you go for Music, you will study musical theory, instruments, perfect harmonies, and numerous musical styles. You will work with other talented musicians, just like you. After graduation, you’ll be an expert in playing at least one instrument.
A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Arts, Design & Architecture opens up many career opportunities. In addition to the subfields we’ve already mentioned, you can specialise in Fashion Design, Film, Photography & Media, Theatre & Dance, User Experience Design, and others.



Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Architecture are closely connected to other disciplines like Arts and Design. Architecture is very important in human history and anthropology, considering we each inhabit the big structures built by our ancestors. Architecture degrees share ties to academic subjects like Construction Engineering, Graphic Design, User Experience Design and Arts.
Architects need to have an eye for beauty, utility and durability. During architecture school, you will learn about architectural styles, the science of designing, design structures, landscape architecture and 3D designs. You will also discover computer software such as Computer-Aided Design (CAD), which helps you to plan, analyse and optimise design work. Your degree in Architecture will teach you all about design rules, where you should follow them, and where you'll have some room for exploration and creativity. Knowing how to work with texture, colour, contrast, lighting and many other aspects will allow you to become an expert in designing buildings. Of course, you will also have to make sure your vision can also be built according to safety standards and available resources.
Some of the courses Architecture students will gain access to include: Analysis of Contemporary Architecture, City Design and Development, Urban Design Policy, Residential Design, and Green Construction.
After graduating with a degree in Architecture, you will have the opportunity to work as a: licensed architect, CAD technician, interior and spatial designer, and urban designer. Other jobs you can find are: building surveyor, construction manager, landscape architect, or structural engineer.

Landscape architecture is the art of planning, designing, maintaining, rehabilitating and preserving the green space and design of man-made constructions. Landscape architecture degrees focus on topics such as architectural design, site planning, living space design, urban planning, urban design, park planning, regional planning, and historic preservation. Landscape architecture also continues to create innovative solutions to current issues related to green space aesthetics of roads, parks and gardens. Programmes reunite numerous elements from others disciplines including: botany, climatology, topography and floriculture.
Bachelors and Masters in Landscape Architecture cover topics such as: plants and their applications, digital landscape graphics, social factors in environmental design, cultural landscape, technical drawing, history of public spaces.
Students of landscape architecture degrees develop skills in aesthetic sensitivity and environmental awareness, as well as creativity in emphasizing the practical applications of design solutions. A landscape architect requires an in-depth knowledge of biology, geography, as well as of the main characteristics of soil and air masses.
Landscape architecture graduates follow careers in lawn administration, maintenance and recondition of green areas. They may work as urban planners, landscape architects, cartographers, floriculture consultants, and more.

Industrial Design is a subject that uses Engineering and Design elements in order to create products that look great and function perfectly. People who work in Industrial Design have a keen eye for detail, precision, a sense of beauty, and problem-solving skills.
Industrial Design courses follow a hands-on approach. Most of your learning will happen while you work on various tasks and projects assigned by professors. Classes also focus on the design process, materials and how they are chosen, electronics, and digital media. Engineering principles and 3D printing will also be an important part of the curriculum. To put it shortly, you will discover how to create quality products from design to delivery, while also adding your personal touch and creativity.
There are people who simply want things to work, and there are others who’d rather have them look great and…barely work. If you choose to study Industrial Design, you’re likely in neither of those teams You want the best of both worlds, and sometimes that can be difficult, but it’s definitely worth it.
People appreciate beautiful design, so you will have to use creativity in the products you create. Sure, that smartphone may be the fastest, or that car might be electric, but the unique design, perfect curves and colour really make it stand out.
After a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Industrial Design, career options are rather designer-centric, but the fields and specialisations are varied. For instance, you can work in the: Automotive Industry, Software Industry, Consumer Products Design, Exhibition Design, Special Effects Field, Marketing Department, or Logistics and Supply Chains.

Design degrees focus on fundamental aspects of design activity, from comprehension and methodology to values and philosophy. Design is often the first step before executing a certain product that has to follow certain aesthetic features and also respond to certain customers’ needs. Students enrolled in a Bachelor or Master in Design will learn to define the particularities of a certain object or concept, shape, size, colour, environment, costs, functionalities, utility, constraints, etc.
The use and attributes of design are becoming more and more diversified and are nowadays present in many different business sectors, from architecture and civil engineering, to organizational and human behaviour. A designer may work in different fields of activity such as: fashion design, interior design, graphic design, industrial design, web design and more. Students will be equipped with illustration skills as they have to be able to develop original ideas and concepts, as well as technical capabilities. They will also develop research and planning skills – in order to set a strategy for approaching each project, creativity and attention to detail.
Although most graduates of design work in media, advertising or software technology, other popular career options include: exhibition designer, interior designer, landscape architect, multimedia specialist, fashion designer and more.

Visual arts are forms of art that focus on creating pieces of work that mainly make use of the visual environment, while trying to convey messages of emotion, ideas or information. Visual arts covers three main sub-fields: fine art (painting, drawing, graphics, sculpture, architecture), decorative art (tapestry, ceramics, mosaic art, glass art, jewellery art) and contemporary art (artistic photography, art print, video art, animation, graffiti art). This discipline relates to similar areas such as art and art history, graphic design and cultural studies.
Students of visual arts usually have the chance to learn about visual expression culture, post-modernism, animation, art history, film, graphic design, photography, print media, and more.
Graduates will gain general competencies to explore the artistic message expressed in visual language, as well as conduct functional or aesthetic creations using various basic materials and techniques. They will gain knowledge of design techniques, master the use of colour and understand theories of composition.
Career opportunities for visual arts graduates include: desktop publisher, photographer, make-up artist, drafter, craft artist, exhibition designer, glass blower, graphic designer, illustrator.


... popular visual arts of the present. You may study a degree that will teach you all the inner workings that make a feature movie, documentary or short film come to life. Or, study a degree in Photography, teaching you the subtleties of capturing shape, light, colour and framing them in the perfect ways. While a Media degree may explore ways of combining film and photography with other emerging visual tools such as digital integration. Students of Film, Photography & Media degrees will attend classes covering topics such as Commercial Photography, Photojournalism, Film Interpretation, the History of Media, and more. A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Film will explore the complex relationship between film and television, the fascinating progress of the film industry, what are the main steps of film production as well as filming techniques, tricks, and ways of interacting and communicating ideas to the audience. Some courses will also deep-dive into the main film schools throughout history and the way they have influenced movie-making art, up until the present. Explore the development of movies from silent movies, black and white films up until current day block-busters.
Photogrophy degree programmes are the first step to take for professional photogrophers and explore digital and analog photography and ways to convey powerful messages by capturing static moments. Students taking courses in Film or Photography will also understand the ways that society and culture influence media and vice-versa. Graduates can look forward to prospective careers such as movie directing, freelance photography, photojournalism, camera operating, film and video editing, or visual effects editing.

Music, or musicology is the art of combining sounds, represented as musical notes, in a succession or simultaneously in an aesthetically pleasant and rhythmical form and the integration of these aspects in a complete piece. Music uses musical instruments or the human voice to create art. Music is divided in genres that are characterised by similar melody, harmonic, rhythmic, form, orchestration, literary text where applicable and other compositional aspects.
A Bachelor or Master degree in music is very complex and can be focused on mastering a certain musical instrument, or mastering composition, conducting and orchestra or being an expert in music history. The study of music has many sub-disciplines like: ethnomusicology, historical musicology, music theory, music analysis, musical composition, musical critic and others. Students enrolled in a music degree will gain skills like: creativity, ability to work independently and become more responsible, organised and orderly persons. By studying music, students will be able to express themselves to a range of audiences and be understood and select repertoires suited to particular performance contexts. The wide array of possible careers for music graduates include: musician/performer, music teacher, music composer, music therapist, sound technician, radio producer, radio broadcast assistant, broadcast engineer, artist representative, artist agent/manager.

Art history is a specialised branch of history that studies the evolution of culture through artistic productions such as paintings, sculptures, architecture, and the graphic and decorative arts. One of the broadest fields in humanities sciences, the art history discipline studies methodologies and critical theory, analysing contemporary issues in the practice and display of art. Art history is related with other disciplines like history, philosophy, and the visual arts.
Some subjects of art history courses cover Greek art, medieval art and architecture, topography of modern Rome, history and aesthetics of photography, as well as contemporary artistic movements.
By studying art history, future professionals achieve skills in the critical analysis of art works. Students cultivate visual literacy and appreciation for aesthetics. Art historians will be able to determine the period a work of art belongs to and will gain insight into detecting fake creations. They will also gain interpretative skills and technological abilities related to visual communication.
Art history graduates pursue diverse careers in settings such as: colleges and universities, archives and libraries, museums, auction houses, art galleries, preservation firms, or historical societies. They can engage in jobs like artist representative, museum curator, art advisor, gallery archivist, and more.

Studying Graphic Design is a great choice for creative people who like playing with colours, forms and images and who want to create great visual content to communicate messages. A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Graphic Design will teach you all there is to know about typography, page layout techniques, user interface (UI), user experience (UX) and industry-specific software.
There are many sub-fields you can choose from: Creative App Development, Illustration, Interaction Design, Visual Communication, and others. While developing your skills in one of these Graphic Design specialisations you will learn how to use dedicated software programmes. During the studies, you will discover key design principles (related to colour, shape, order, spacing, etc.) and they will allow you to create interesting and captivating content.
These are some of the jobs you can opt for after a Bachelor’s or Master’s in Graphic Design: advertising art director, animator, artworker, graphic designer, illustrator, printmaker and many others.

Interior design has gained the status of an independent discipline that involves improving living conditions by creating an environment that combines aesthetic principles as well as anthropology and ergonomics. Inerior design helps the growing functionality and quality of interior spaces by combining creativity with visual sensitivity as well as technical elements. Interior design is related to similar disciplines such as graphic design, industrial design and landscape architecture.
There are three main areas of interest in interior design: house decoration, residential design and commercial design. Interior design programmes offer knowledge and relevant information on elements and principles of design, architectural design and survey, interior planning, or graphic techniques for interior design.
Interior design degrees offer students creative abilities and excellent interpersonal skills. Interior design professionals are generally organised people with a great attention to detail. In terms of technical skills, these students require the ability to make calculations and to be proficient in design software applications. An interior designer is responsible for selecting the convenient materials and products that will be used to create and furnish living spaces and must know how texture, colour, lighting and other factors combine and interact.
Graduates of Bachelors in Interior Desing usually embrace careers as interior designers, landscape decorators, event planners, exhibitions designers, etc.

Theatre is an old form of art, dating back to antiquity. Based on the area of fiction known as drama, theatre is a complex art that combines different elements that aim to transmit a certain feeling, idea or inner state to the audience. This can be achieved through the text of the theatrical play, music, dance, mimic and various specific techniques. Dance is an art form intended to orient and produce synchronised body movements and continuous exchange of artistic positions of the human body on a certain rhythm. Dance is strongly linked with music, emotional images and content embodiment through choreographic composition, figures and movements. Dance is used as a method of individual expression as well as a way of social communication.
Theatre and dance courses cover topics like: poetics of performance, history of dance, Greek drama, musical theatre performance, gender in dance and theatre, scene design, aspects of choreography.
Studying theatre and dance requires approaching the two art forms from an interdisciplinary, intercultural and international perspective. Students will develop analytical, technical and imaginative abilities leading to a good stage performance. Future theatre and dance professionals are creative thinkers and they have abilities in efficient oral communication, as well as abilities in gesticulation and pantomime.
Graduates may find job opportunities in areas such as: theatre direction, choreography/movement coaching, arts management, dance studios, and more.


...culture at large. These are some of the aspects Social Sciences deal with: human relationships, communication, ethics, trade, and many others.
With subjects like Economics, Cultural Studies, Communication Sciences, Psychology, and Gender & Sexuality Studies, Social Sciences is a field combining theory and research. Social Sciences always aim for old concepts and notions to be adapted to modern contexts and with contemporary applications.
Courses in Social Sciences are perfect for people who want to understand why humans behave the way they do and how human society can be improved. Students learn how to engage in a variety of subjects, some of them very complex in nature. You’ll learn to think critically and see where you can contribute to make your community a better place.
You’ll also have the satisfaction (and often the challenge) of trying to understand humans, both as individuals and as a species. Looking at how far the modern world has come, no human should miss basic needs, such as food, shelter, clothing and equal access to education, healthcare and work. Social Sciences try to identify, understand and solve some of the problems that are still very real in the 21st century. What are we missing? Social Sciences might be the perfect platform through which you can express yourself and actually make a positive change in the world.
Some of the best jobs a Social Sciences graduate can aspire to are: charity officer, mediator, psychologist, management consultant, social worker investment advisor, detective or criminal investigator, geospatial analyst, urban planner, employee relations specialist, and many others.

Archaeology focuses on ancient and old cultures and civilizations and their social and cultural composition. All of this is done through research, excavations, analysis, interpreting and documenting the discovered evidence. Ancient civilizations expressed their cultural richness through more ways besides writing, challenging archaeology to find creative ways to complete their complex historical puzzle using innovative new means and creative solutions.
Students who enrol in a Master’s degree in archaeology cam specialize in one of the field’s main sub-disciplines: historical archaeology, ethno-archaeology and experimental archaeology. However, since a significant amount of evidence has been discovered, modern archaeology now is a processual discipline, that follows science and evidence that can be tested using modern technology.
Archaeology involves a lot of practice, so that students can quickly develop observation and analytical skills. A Master’s degree in archaeology places students on the employment market as archaeologists, heritage managers, museum education officers, museum/gallery curators or even as archivists or cartographers.

Communication sciences see the human behaviour from a scientific point of view and focus on nonverbal/verbal and intercultural communication, as well as rhetorical studies. This field of study influences, on one hand, the interpretation of received information and, on the other hand, controls the way a message is being sent.
During a Bachelor’s degree in communication sciences, students learn how to explain communication issues and put their knowledge into practice through experimental design, surveys, focus groups, conversation analysis and interviews. Research is an important aspect of this study and is mostly visible when students enrol in a Master’s degree in communication sciences.
Communications sciences are inter connected to psychology, sociology, political sciences and other fields that target human behaviour and its evolution. The practical side is centred around mass media technologies. Graduates can find high paid jobs in public relations, online media, journalism and other publishing institutions, as well as in the advertising industry.

Anthropology captures the particularities of human beings and animals, such as the origins, biologic features, social and physical characteristics. This study of humankind aims to understand the existence of the human species throughout history.
Students who enrol in a Master degree in anthropology can specialize in archaeology and biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. During the programme, they will have the chance to research through techniques and models that also show results in cognitive science and ethnic studies. While in Europe archaeology is seen as an independent discipline, in the U.S.A. it is considered a branch of anthropology.
Anthropology can be applied to any field of the human culture, including family, economy, symbolism, socialism and food customs. Graduates of a Master’s programme in anthropology may continue their research with careers in social science or can find jobs in the public and private sector. Many of the anthropologists built careers as charity officers, market researchers, community development workers, journalists or human resources managers.

Ethnic studies take an in-depth look on an ethnicity with all its characteristics: cultural heritage, political issues, language, identity and social groups. The study develops skills such as critical thinking and analyse, research and understanding of social groups and different communities.
The aim of ethnic studies degrees is to earn enough knowledge about an ethnicity in order to stimulate social justice and give answers regarding multiculturalism. Since it derived from history, this discipline develops analysis of minorities and their behaviour. A Master’s programme in ethnic studies will focus on present day concerns, such as racism, conflicts between community and migration.
Studying the cultural and social aspects of certain ethnicities will help students find employment in the public and private sector, as sociologists, lecturers, journalists, community or housing developers or social workers. Graduation from a Master’s degree in ethnic studies will help students view the international context with a clear mind.

Geography is divided into two inter-connected sub-disciplines: physical geography and human geography. Physical geography uses plenty of techniques and information from cartography, while human geography analyses topics related to human society such as agriculture, economy, population distribution, etc. The interaction between humans and the Earth is an object of study especially for students in a Master’s degree in geography.
The traditional fields that are studied during such a programme concern land formations, inhabitants, terrain and the derived phenomena. Specializations can be taken in physical study, relations between man and land, Earth science and the spatial analysis of natural and human phenomena. The main skill that students gain after a Master degree in geography is the understanding of the complex natural and artificial mechanism of the Earth.
Geography is also one of the basic sciences in education and helps students acquire skills in matters of conflict and war, energy dependence, climate change, globalization and terrorism. Graduates can easily get employed as cartographers, international development workers or tourism officers.

International Relations is a subdiscipline in the field of Social Sciences. It connects to numerous other subjects, including Politics, History, Linguistics, Economics, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Business, and Law. People involved in International Relations analyse global problems, such as poverty, human rights, ethics, and try to find solutions based on interdisciplinary research.
During courses, International Relations students are taught about the effects of globalisation and global policies. They also discover how political systems interact and what their impact is worldwide. It’s no accident that several international diplomats, ambassadors, and presidents studied a university degree in International Relations.
You’ll also learn how national interests influence decisions related to international affairs. This is tightly related to the relationships between international companies and governments. Other skills you’ll develop are communication, negotiation, research and problem-solving. These will come in handy if you become a diplomat, and you’ll have to reach a beneficial agreement between nations.
Also, you’ll be paving the way for a future career in International Politics, International Business, International Diplomacy, or International Law. Students who graduate from a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree programme in International Relations find jobs as a: diplomatic service officer, intelligence analyst, policy officer, public affairs consultant and others.

Psychology is a subdiscipline in the field of Social Sciences. By studying a Bachelor's or Mater's degree in Psychology you will learn all about every aspect related to the human psyche and how people are influenced by society, culture, and contemporary era challenges. You'll explore diverse topics, trying to answer questions such as: Is the mind just a byproduct of brain processes? Is behaviour learned or inherited? What is the nature of the human subconscious? How can people change their behaviour through self-discovery? The field of Psychology can help you understand a broad range of human behaviours as well as the many forms that mental health issues take. Psychology students will combine theoretical classes with practical work experience and case studies on issues such as trauma, mental disorders, addiction, child development, and current therapy methods, among others.
Psychology has a multitude of subfields, such as: Clinical Psychology, Cognitive and Perceptual Psychology, Behavioural Psychology, Neuropsychology, Developmental Psychology, Educational Psychology, Experimental Psychology or forms of Depth Psychology (focusing on unconscious processes).
By graduating Psychology degrees, students around the world gain access to a wide variety of career options including: psychotherapist, psychology counsellor, occupational psychologist, school counsellor, human resource officer, play therapist, forensic psychologist, organizational psychologist (I-O), and more.

Sociology is a study field which deals with human social behaviour. It can be also defined as the study of the origins, organization, institutions, and development of human society. Sociology is a part of social science and aims to acquire knowledge about human social factors by performing empirical and critical analysis through qualitative and quantitative techniques, interpretative, hermeneutic and philosophic approaches. The study field looks into the factors such as deviance, social stratification, social class, culture, social mobility, law and religion and develops scientific knowledge. Sociologists try to understand the issues that influence society. Sociology students discover answers to critical questions for our society like: how is culture created? Is social equality possible?
Students enrolled in a Bachelor or Master in Sociology will develop their communication, analytical and research skills as well as their understanding of various human aspects and behaviours.
Graduates of sociology degrees usually follow one of these paths: criminal justice, human services, education, research, policy or business. Find work in diverse and versatile fields as a public relations representative, rehabilitation counsellor, journalist, advocacy expert, state agent, and many more.

International Development is a subfield of Social Sciences that focuses on raising wellbeing globally. Its approach is interdisciplinary, combining knowledge from Political Science, Sociology and Economics. The subject of International Development is based on the idea that, in an interconnected world, if others are doing a bit better, this will also have a positive impact on everyone else.
Some of the main problems tackled by people who work in International Development are poverty, malnutrition, water and sanitation, education, healthcare and upholding human rights. During International Development courses, students will analyse national and international policies in an effort to find solutions and help institutions improve the living standards in developing countries, which need it the most. You will learn project management skills, which you can use to cooperate with governments. Together, you’ll be able to implement projects focusing on boosting the local economy, allocating resources more efficiently, implementing conservation policies and combating poverty.
Graduates of International Development are generally employed by NGOs, foundations, consultants, or advocates, and can find jobs in fields such as Research, Policymaking, Diplomacy, PR, and Advocacy.

Econometrics is a part of the economics sciences discipline and deals with the analysis of mathematical and statistical data. It helps experts develop effective economic models, leading to problem solving, to test new theories and analyse data. Econometrics is based on quantitative analysis of various economic phenomena.
Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in econometrics teach students to add empirical content to the theories that allow them to be analysed and evaluated. Statistical theory contributes to development of econometric models and methods that help to solve economic questions. Data is usually collected through observations and is processed using standard statistical models. Regression analysis has an important role in econometrics and it contributes to problem solving as statistical technique. Find plenty of Masters and Bachelors in Econometrics at universities worldwide to find out how to best make use of these techniques and analytical tools.
Econometrics helps solve problems for business sectors, governments, consultancy companies, or non-profit organisations. Graduates of econometrics degrees can work in insurance companies, banks, marketing companies, governmental institutions, consultancy firms, and more.

Cognitive sciences study the construction of theories that explain human behaviour and intelligence. Their focus is to illustrate information processing mechanisms and their impact on the personality. The field of study also tries to understand other kinds of minds as those of animals, aliens, or artificial minds. Basic areas of interest include understanding the neurobiological processes in the brain, the study of human behaviour based on experimental methods from psychology and language, and analysing information on computational mechanisms, based on representations.
The field of cognitive sciences is related to disciplines like psychology, philosophy, and linguistics. Sub-disciplines of cognitive science include: cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, or neuroscience.
Curriculums include subjects such as neuroscience and behaviour, experimental molecular neurobiology, probability and causality in human cognition, psycholinguistics, music perception, behaviour-based robotics, and more.
Students gain excellent perception and memory, while exercising critical thinking and reasoning. They learn to collect and analyse empirical data and to generate and test scientific hypotheses. Cognitive scientists can also evaluate complex systems and conduct abstract mathematical analyses. Graduates may find job opportunities in a wide range of areas including: telecommunications, data representation, human performance testing, speech synthesis and voice recognition, artificial intelligence, counselling and more.

Criminology is a multidisciplinary science that studies a diverse set of information related to criminal activities such as individual and group criminal activities, perpetrator psychology and effective means of rehabilitation. Criminology degrees examine social reaction to crime, methods and procedures to prevent and combat crime and social protection from crime. Criminology combines theories from other disciplines like psychology, sociology and law.
Curricula of Masters in Criminology offer students information on juvenile delinquency, cultures of crime, neighbourhood dynamics of crime, deviance and social control, terrorism, forensic science and criminal justice.
Students will acquire relevant knowledge of public policies and the ability to interpret their impact on society. They also develop skills like critical observation and attention to detail, strong analytical and investigative thinking. A criminology expert has a thorough knowledge of research methods and understands causes of criminal behaviour.
Graduates can find jobs in the field as counsellors, drug enforcement officials, investigative agents, probation officers or community development workers.

Political Science deals with government and politics at state, national, and international levels. It focuses on understanding and implementing effective practices to develop and improve societies.
Some of the subfields of Political Science are Political Theory, History of Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Methodology, Public Policy and others. Politics courses will teach you how to critically analyse political discourse and tactics, how to run a political campaign, and how to create voter awareness.
You’ll also develop debating skills and discover how you can successfully build political arguments. You will be taught about the distribution of power and resources and how they impact individual countries and international relations. Additionally, you'll discover how to use factors such as ethics, justice, peace, and public health to analyse and measure the success of governance and democracy and how to improve them.
A Bachelor's or Master's in Public Science will lead to a successful career as a politician, lobbyist, political campaign manager, political consultant, PR specialist, legal assistant, political commentator and others.


... on plants, animals, and the environments in which they thrive. You’ll learn about forest restoration, managing natural resources, food production, and preserving the natural beauty that surrounds us.
Experts in Agriculture & Forestry also work with crop rotation and preserving the soil’s mineral qualities. They make sure that products follow industry standards and reach the markets. This is essential in the mass production of food, whose demand will grow as the human population increases.
Agriculture & Forestry students can find themselves working in Horticulture, Animal Sciences, Aquaculture and Fisheries, and other subfields.
There are plenty of opportunities for you, once you decide to pursue a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Agriculture & Forestry. You can help businesses manage their ecological impact; establish and preserve wildlife, knowing exactly how animal husbandry and cultivating plants affects the environment; or you can create spectacular garden landscapes for everyone to admire.
During courses, you will also learn how to properly manage forests. Many people still depend on lumber, as alternative building materials and energy sources’ popularity is growing slowly. You will be responsible for finding a balance that maintains the health of forests, while also providing for our needs.
Agriculture & Forestry students can also focus on permaculture, a concept that fully embraces the idea of working with nature, rather than against it. Permaculture aims to create systems that produce no waste and are beneficial for us and the environment. Permaculture principles are applied in many fields, including regenerative agriculture and rewilding. The need for this type of approaches will keep growing in the next years.
Agriculture & Forestry graduates find themselves in diverse careers, working as agricultural engineers, agronomists, forests rangers, conservationists, nutrient management specialists, landscapers, water management planners, and others. Here are other related fields you might be interested in environmental sustainability, food science, geology, ecology, animal husbandry.

Animal sciences deal with the study of domestic animals, researching the structure, development, way of life and their relationship with the environment. The focus of the animal sciences discipline is to offer knowledge about breeding, growth, improvement and exploitation of domestic animals. Animal sciences study improvement methods that ensure proper nutrition (feeding), breeding, conservation and preservation of livestock.
The animal sciences discipline integrates theories and concepts from biology, chemistry, agriculture and veterinary medicine.
Courses include topics on domestic animal biology, animal genetics, immunology in animal health and disease, animals in biomedical research, and more.
Students in animal sciences programmes are able to combine and analyse knowledge from biochemistry, anatomy and genetics with concepts from economy, management, or marketing. They will also develop skills on how to design, organise and manage animal farms and animal production processes in all species of domestic animals. Animal scientists will learn computer skills as they have to analyse data and make use of statistical techniques.
Graduates may find job opportunities in a wide range of areas including: animal breeding, food and fibre production, animal behaviour and welfare, biotechnology, etc. They can engage in jobs like animal scientist, livestock manager, pet breeder, dog trainer and more.

Aquaculture and fisheries refer to breeding and harvesting water plants and animals for commercial purposes. The aquaculture discipline studies biological processes related to fish farming technologies. The field of aquaculture assists in the demand for seafood and also enables existing fisheries remain sustainable and consistent. The aquaculture and fisheries discipline borrows theories from other disciplines like: biology, animal sciences, biodiversity and conservation.
Topics covered by programmes in aquaculture and fisheries include: animal diversity, introductory microbiology, shellfish aquaculture, genetics of fish, politics of the ocean, fish processing, aquaculture systems engineering.
By studying aquaculture and fisheries, future professionals use theories and concepts, develop knowledge of animal breeding, processing and evaluation of their productions. Students will understand and adapt scientific knowledge in aquaculture and natural resource conservation, planning and development. An aquaculture specialist will keep up to date with innovations in the fisheries sector and may take up responsibilities such as protecting resources from overfishing, the dangers of industrial waste and pollution.
Career prospects for graduates cover jobs like: technicians and managers in fish farms, scientific observers, fishing fleet and regional fisheries managers, biologists in organisations such as aqua or fish centres.

Forestry studies the complex relation between climate, soils and rocks, water, animals and plants, as they are all considered defining elements of a forest. Forestry is focused on ecology, preserving resources that can be affected by harmful human activities or natural disasters. The forestry discipline applies scientific, economic and social principles used in the establishment and management of forests. Forestry studies include genetics, forest economics, zoology, botany, environmental protection, and ecosystems in forests.
Class curricula offer students relevant information on: wood anatomy, forest economics and science, forest resource management, organic pollutants in the environment, taxonomy of trees, dendrology, and agroforestry.
Students in forestry studies are prepared to identify the main species of terrestrial and aquatic flora and fauna. They will be able to understand the interactions between ecological factors and forest ecosystem functions and will gain knowledge of soil properties and processes specific to forest sites. Future forest experts are also able to develop management plans and options for forested landscapes while meeting the needs of society and maintaining the integrity of the ecosystem.
Graduates can find jobs in the field working as forest biologists, professional foresters, wood engineers, forestry business administrators, or conservationists.

Plant sciences deal with the study of plants by gaining knowledge of plant morphology, biogeography, classification, histology (microscopic structure), physiology, and plant pathology. Crop sciences study ways of improving crops and agricultural productivity while effectively managing pests. The aim of plant and crop sciences programmes is to analyse interactions of plants and crops with the environments they grow in.
Professionals of plant and crop sciences ensure plant growth, development and quality. They use natural resources and conservation practices to produce food, fuel, fibre, and pharmaceutical crops, while maintaining the health of the natural environment. Plant and crop sciences are a subdivision of agriculture and are related to such subjects as botany, genetics, environmental sciences, soil sciences, entomology, and more.
Students will have the opportunity to combine theoretical disciplines with practical laboratory work in research centres.
Courses provided to students in plant and crop sciences offer relevant knowledge on: sustainable agriculture, field crop systems, seed biology, pest management, crop management, water management, plant breeding and genetics, or seed science.
Careers in the area of plant and crop sciences include jobs such as agronomist, agricultural consultant, soil scientist, botanist, food scientist, agriculture manager, and more.

Horticulture is the agronomic science that deals with the study of growing trees, vegetables, flowers, and landscape architecture. The horticulture discipline is concerned with cultivating plants for human consumption, but also for medical purposes or simply for aesthetic pleasure. Horticulture also combines science and technology with art and design principles.
Horticulture is divided into five main branches: pomology, viticulture, floriculture, oenology and landscape architecture.
Course topics in horticulture cover plant biotechnology, environmental and horticultural biology, urban ecology, wild plant identification, fruit development, and more. Programmes in horticulture also offer the opportunity to combine theoretical information with practical training in greenhouses.
By studying horticulture, students gain knowledge of plants and ways to care for them, and they will be able to make correlations between environmental factors and plant cultivation. Future horticulture professionals also learn to establish the proper design principles for landscape gardening.
Graduates may find job opportunities in areas including: landscape design, floral event planning, crop development and plant genetics. They usually follow jobs like: horticulture engineer, gardener, green keeper, advisor, researcher or teacher.


... you develop specific skills needed to practise a certain profession. Although theoretical courses are included, Applied Sciences & Professions stand out through their practical knowledge and hands-on approach. They are the type of degrees that turn students into specialists upon graduation. That’s why students who apply for Applied Professions degrees are actually undergoing training for their future work and vocation, as part of their programme.
Some of the disciplines within Applied Professions are Social Work, Fashion, Emergency & Disaster Management, Food Sciences, and others. In Applied Sciences, the most popular fields are Healthcare, Technology, and Engineering.
Courses in Applied Sciences and Professions will focus on helping students find solutions to the specific real-life problems they’ll face in their future work. They will vary greatly depending on your specialisation. For example, if you choose Social Work, you’ll need to develop soft skills, such as communication, empathy, and cooperation. You should also know how to work and interact with people and enjoy helping them overcome their issues.
If you opt for an Emergency & Disaster Management degree, classes will focus on understanding, preventing, and preparing for emergencies. You’ll learn how to respond and maintain your calm during an emergency and educate people on how to react in such a situation.
A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Applied Sciences & Professions will help you find jobs in the subfields we’ve mentioned earlier, as well as in Library Science, Museum Studies, Military Science, Real Estate & Property Management, Family & Consumer Science, and others.

Real estate and property management teaches students effective ways to manage, administer and sell property owned by another party or entity. Professionals may handle all aspects related to a property, from finding potential buyers, maintaining house integrity, or making sure tenants respect their contractual obligations. Managed properties include residential and vacation properties, commercial retail space or industrial warehouse space. The real estate and property management discipline deals with four major areas: marketing and financial aspects, tenant and occupancy, facilities of property, and administration and risk. Real estate and property management integrates theories from other disciplines like: accounting, finance, business administration and strategic management.
Students will obtain in-depth knowledge of property maintenance and functional and aesthetical development of buildings. Future professionals understand information related to operating expenses and budgeting. Property managers develop negotiation and communication skills, as they have to solve disputes between tenants, negotiate prices when selling properties, and carry out their clients' requests.
Graduates can find careers in the field working as: real estate appraiser/broker, investment analyser, corporate asset/property manager, community association manager.

Library science is mainly concerned with the retrieval and management of information under any form. This discipline has become very complex due to the high technological development in our society. Libraries continue to hold an important role in the academic world, while making greater use of technology, compared to the past. Belonging to an interdisciplinary field of study, library science degrees borrow tools from areas such as management, information technology and education, to collect, organise, preserve, and prioritise information resources. Library science is associated with many sub-fields such as documentation science, bibliography, information management, knowledge management, etc. As an increasingly digitalised field of activity, library science is often associated with study programmes in informatics and information science.
Students of library science degrees learn to navigate the digital world, to properly handle information and to enable users to access it easily. Professionals also become accustomed to the legal status of libraries and records management and learn how to use specialised computer software to organise their work.
Specialisations in library sciences include studies in digital libraries, archives and records management, rare manuscripts, school library, and others.
Library science degrees prepare professionals who can work in government, archives, information agencies, cultural organisations, museums, libraries, business intelligence firms and other organisations engaged in information activities.

Social work is an academic discipline studying and promoting the quality of life of individuals and the well-being of the community. Social work integrates knowledge about human and community development, social policy and administration, human interaction, and the influence and manipulation of social, political and psychological factors upon society. Social work degrees combine theories from different other fields such as sociology, medicine, psychology, philosophy, politics and economics in order to enable complete understanding and shaping power over the social mechanisms of any kind.
By studying a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in social work you will develop the following skills and qualities: empathy, active listening, social perceptiveness, persuasion, cooperation, critical thinking, communication and interpersonal skills. Professional social workers focus on providing help to individuals or communities suffering from poverty, lack of opportunities or information, social injustice, persecution, abuse or violation of rights and they have to connect individuals with the resources they need, advocate for individual clients or the community on identified problems.
Graduates of social work studies usually get careers opportunities such as: probation officer, advice worker, careers adviser, charity officer, counsellor, volunteer coordinator, youth worker, social policy analyst and more.

Forensic science, or forensics, is concerned with gathering and analysing the evidence from a criminal case with the purpose of revealing the truth. By analysing fingerprints, footprints, blood spatter, traces and remains, forensic scientists seek to reveal the identities of criminals, as well as the complete facts related to criminal events.
Forensic science degrees rely on other sciences like medicine, physics, engineering, computer science, psychology and many others. Forensics specialists form interdisciplinary teams of experts and go through complex scientific processes to piece together the complete picture of a crime scene.
Forensic science also includes more specialised sub-fields, sometimes offered as stand-alone degree programmes in forensic medicine, forensic anthropology, drug analysis, toxicology, entomology, environmental forensics, biological evidence, forensic DNA analysis, and more. Students who want to pursue a Master's degree in forensic science will benefit from practical classes and lab work, and gain valuable skills that will help them investigate facts such as analytical and critical thinking, computer training, and scientific writing.
Graduates may practice in crime and medical diagnostic labs, medical examiners, offices, prosecution attorney offices, hospitals, clinical chemistry laboratories, crime laboratories, law enforcement, education, and criminal defence.

Fashion textile and luxury goods degrees offer knowledge and expertise related to the creation of textiles, clothing and fashion accessories. This field also focuses on the management of fashion items and the trade that consists of this type of products and involves an in-depth understanding of the different steps of creation, production and marketing of items.
Fashion textile and luxury goods encompasses a series of sub-disciplines, such as women clothing design, men clothing design, shoes design, jewellery design and production, all covering the whole production and supply chain of this industry.
A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in fashion textiles and luxury goods aims at teaching students how to design their ideas and transform them into products that satisfy all potential requirements. This field will encourage and enable students to draw upon the creative and artistic problem-solving solutions in mastering silhouettes, structures and materials of clothing and luxury goods. Students will also pursue an analytic and critic approach to trends and events, develop creativity and talent as well as practical ability and technical understanding.
Careers that fashion textiles and luxury goods graduates can pursue include: clothing designer, fashion designer, fashion accessories designer, fashion and design journalist, textile and/or luxury goods product manager, PR specialist.


... inspire people of all ages and help them develop and be able to overcome life-challenges and find creative solutions to difficult situations that come up in life.
Education & Training is a multidisciplinary field that covers aspects of Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, Economics, Counselling - all forming the fundamentals on which your future teaching strategy will be built and implemented. You need to adapt this strategy to the needs of the students your work with. Depending on your specialisation, you might teach pre-schoolers, school children, adolescents or adults. They all learn differently, and you need to adapt your methods to your audience to be a successful teacher. During Teaching courses, you will learn how to keep a class interested and engaged and how to mix theoretical elements with applying newly learned concepts, as well as interactive group activities. You will also be taught how to encourage and improve people's natural learning abilities, how to create lesson plans and explain complex concepts.
Additionally, you will also discover how to listen to people and support them on their self-development or self-discovery journeys. All these skills will allow you to empower individuals and teach them how to learn, which is a very important process as they go through different stages of their life.
Teaching is a very challenging career move, and since there is such a broad range of fields that require expert education and training, the range of careers you will find is quite wide. Here are some of them: teacher, education consultant, English as a foreign language teacher, learning mentor, counsellor, personal coach.

Education is a broad field of study that covers teaching, training and tutoring techniques dedicated to future professionals, who plan to help pupils or students develop intellectual and practical skills. A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in Education focuses on planning learning, classroom assessment, and teaching.
You can specialise in different subfields, such as primary education, secondary education, adult education, or choose a specific subject (e.g. mathematics, biology).
Degree courses in Education focus on developing a wide variety of skills. The ability to work and communicate with children of different age groups is one of the most important ones. You learn how to use their natural curiosity and grow their interest in learning. You will also discover how adult learning works and what are the differences in the learning processes between people of different ages. You’ll also have classes focused on teaching people with various disabilities. Research, analytical, problem-solving and organisation skills will come in handy when you'll have to plan lessons and design curricula.
You'll also need to adapt your planning depending on pupils or students’ specific learning abilities and improve their educational experience. You can use non-formal education principles to keep things fresh and interesting. Above all, you should develop students' thirst for knowledge, which will keep them learning throughout their entire life.
Working in the Education field allows you to inspire and encourage people to better themselves. You’ve probably had one teacher who influenced you more than all the others. He or she had a certain understanding, patience, and simply knew how to explain lessons in a fun and interesting way. You can become that kind of teacher yourself and work on nurturing future generations. They need to be guided, and if you love teaching people and helping them grow, this might be the perfect career path for you.
Education graduates have successful careers as teachers, trainers, tutors, school administrators, school counsellors, education specialists, etc.

Special education is directed towards students with special needs or with disabilities such as: communication challenges, learning challenges, physical disabilities, emotional or mental disorders, behavioural disorders or intellectual giftedness. Special education differs from the regular type of education through the format and the delivery of the knowledge that are both designed in such a way that suits the particular needs of the student that is involved in the process.
Students of special education learn about specific instructional strategies and about alternative teaching methods that suit the category of students that the education addresses. They will develop skills like: creativity – as they will have to apply creative ideas in learning activities, good interpersonal skills, the ability to identify emotions and physical and psychological needs in order to adapt or change teaching strategy. Special education students are desirable to have native qualities, such as: patience, intuition, understanding, flexibility and adaptability.
The typical career paths for graduates of special education degree are: special education teacher, special education counsellor, social/child care worker, teacher assistant, instructional coordinator, occupational therapist.

Adult education programmes focus on training teachers who can provide instruction to adult students looking to advance their general knowledge, gain credentials or seeking a career change or advancement.
Students gain theoretical knowledge, research skills and the ability to apply adult education principles while teaching. They will learn to adapt to the particular needs of adults, and find out how to motivate adults to share their professional experiences and help them learn through discussions, collaboration and practical activities. Future adult education teachers will also learn how to effectively make use of online learning mediums (e-learning), typically used in flexible adult education classes. Future teachers will also gain in-depth knowledge about critical issues in adult learning, instructional design and strategies, assessment, management and marketing, while adapting to the diverse cultural background of the students.
Specialisations or concentrations may include topics such as education technology, literacy or distance education.
Teachers in adult education may practice in various settings including corporate training, professional development, community college, non-profit or human services. Some programs also qualify graduates to become trainers in specific professions, such as emergency medical technician training (EMT), health training, life coaching, and others.

Coaching focuses on preparing professionals who can help others overcome challenging work situations in various fields. Coaches teach clients to reach their full potential through practical exercises and self-motivation. This discipline does not necessarily teach how to complete specific tasks, but rather makes use of effective tools and techniques to help learners discover their own solutions to achieve personal or professional goals.
Coaching is related to other disciplines such as education, management, training, psychology, neuroscience, social sciences, and various forms of counselling.
A successful coach usually first learns how to apply his knowledge on himself, by undergoing his own personal coaching. Professional coaching uses a range of communication skills such as targeted restatements, listening, questioning, clarifying, etc. Students enrolled in coaching studies learn how to create their own coaching models, based on their personal strengths and insight, and how to discover a niche people might be interested in. Other practical skills include learning how to develop a class schedule, building awareness of people's strengths and weaknesses, analytical and emotional skills, and more.
Graduates of academic coaching programmes may find employment in a wide range of fields of interest such as business, human resources, sports, social work, politics, personal-development, health. Other examples of coaching careers include career, divorce, or conflict coaching.

Counselling deals with helping people overcome emotional and professional challenges in their lives, from career planning, relationship problems, stress, and health issues. Some forms of counselling may also help clients cope with serious mental health issues like chronic anxiety and depression, physical illness and trauma. Counsellors help people to evaluate themselves, accept responsibility for their actions, and make good choices for their future. The relationship between counsellor and client is built on trust and understanding.
Counselling is a broad field including various forms of emotional as well as professional support including: academic advising, art therapy, coaching, psychotherapy, career counselling, psychiatry, school counselling, social work, and others.
Counselling students acquire knowledge about human behaviour, advanced interpersonal skills, learn ethical and professional boundaries and, depending on the career path chosen, may gain therapeutic capacities. Counsellors need a high understanding of themselves, strong empathy, a desire to help people, and ability to contain relationship-based processes taking place between themselves and their clients or patients.
Counsellors facilitate the optimal development of individuals, groups, and organizations, taking into account cultural diversity, personal history, age, educational background and other factors.
Counselling graduates can find work in a variety of settings, including education, human resources, community mental health, private practice, social care services, substance abuse treatment, sexual assault, and corrections.

Educational psychology, or the study of education, is the discipline that focuses on understanding how human beings acquire knowledge and how they are shaped by learning environment. Professionals in the field study cognitive, behavioural, developmental, social, and emotional factors that influence the ability to learn, in order to improve educational practice for children, adults and people with special learning needs.
Educational psychology is closely related to field of psychology, but programmes can be usually found in departments of education at universities. Education psychology is also connected to neuroscience, while recent theories including topics from the field of social sciences.
Programmes can usually be found at the doctorate level, but some universities also offer Master's degrees in educational psychology. Courses use methods such as testing and measurement to find ways to enhance educational activities. Curriculums study topics such as instructional design, human development, classroom management, assessment, supportive learning technologies for various types of students.
Researchers may focus on one or more area of interest such as: basic processes of development, parenting, social networks, development of aggression, emotional and academic self-regulation, play interests, creativity, gerontology, and more.
Graduates may find work as faculty members, researchers, consultants, instructional software developers, test developers, educational programme managers, and other positions in firms, foundations, public schools, state and federal education departments, and the military.

Pedagogy can mean the study of the theory and practice of education, but it can also refer to teaching children and young students in a personal, holistic way. In the latter sense, pedagogy might be regarded as the art of bringing up and offering basic education to children. In some European countries, pedagogy is also more related to social work, as studies in pedagogy may include childcare and early-years services, youth work, parenting and family support services, education for young offenders, or play work.
Students in pedagogy learn ways to effectively teach life-preparing knowledge such as social skills and cultural norms to their future young pupils. Modern approaches include the ability to help young learners to create their own knowledge by teaching to learn, helping them develop critical thinking, stimulate creativity, engage in self and peer assessment, and others.
Universities offer undergraduate and graduate degree programmes in pedagogy but, in some cases, Bachelor?s graduates may only practice as educational assistants. Programmes in primary school education may also be considered as part of the pedagogy discipline.
Graduates of pedagogy programmes have found employment in primary or secondary teaching, as curriculum developers, or education policy analysts. A pedagogue can also occupy various kinds of jobs, and ca work in retirement homes, prisons, orphanages, and human resource management.


... on studying the interactions between humans and the environment. The main objective is solving real-world problems like pollution, deforestation, waste production, or global warming.
Some of the subfields of Environmental Studies & Earth Sciences are Geology, Climate Studies and Meteorology, Toxicology, Biodiversity and Conservation, Natural Hazard Prediction, etc. A Bachelor's or Master's degree in Environmental Studies & Earth Sciences is a great study option for people who like working outdoors and are interested in finding solutions to complex environmental problems. A big part of your work will involve analysing human activities and their impact on nature.
Courses will focus on environmental processes, natural resources, and how you can make predictions for the future. Classes also involve a lot of research. You will learn how to find polluting elements and ways to control or eliminate them. You will spend a lot of time doing field work, collecting air, water, and soil samples, which you will then analyse using laboratory equipment.
All your efforts are aimed at finding effective solutions which can stop or at least limit the negative impact of human activities on the environment. It matters because an increasing number of scientists keep telling us that we’ve already gone over the limit. Big companies need to respect international pollution standards and you can have a positive impact on the implementation of these policies.
As a professional environmental scientist, it will also be your job to educate people on why they should avoid using plastic, recycle it whenever possible and become more aware of the importance of a more eco-friendly lifestyle.
If you choose to focus on Earth Sciences, you will study the physical characteristics of our planet and the atmosphere. You will research natural processes and try to understand how the Earth works, track its changes and their causes. The four main subfields of Earth Sciences are Geology, Oceanography, Meteorology, and Astronomy. Through your work and discoveries, you’ll be able to predict natural disasters, meteorological phenomena, and discover new natural resources.
Environmental Studies & Earth Sciences graduates will find jobs working as nature conservation officers, environmental consultants, sustainability consultants, waste management officers, toxicologists, and many others.

Earth sciences has many practical applications for our planet and the surrounding ones. The field of study has a broad view on the environment and focuses on location and development of energy and mineral resources, methods to protect the planet and the protection of communities from environmental events. Many Bachelor’s degrees in earth sciences focus on knowledge of the consequences of human – environment interaction.
Earth sciences degrees are also known as geoscience, including many sub-disciplines: atmospheric sciences, meteorology, climatology, atmospheric physics, hydrology, oceanography, geodesy, geophysics, geology, mineralogy, glaciology, volcanology, astronomy, etc. With a Master’s degree in Earth Sciences, students can specialize and research one of the world’s most spoken about academic subjects.
Earth sciences graduates can work in many areas, especially geology, environmental science, environmental consultancy firms or governmental institutions. Some of the most popular career options include engineering geologist, geoscientist, environmental consultant or minerals surveyor.

Toxicology studies the negative effects of chemicals on different living organisms, with special attention given to how they affect humans. Toxicologists investigate, interpret and communicate how these effects take place and provide the necessary information for implementing protection measures.
Specialised toxicology degrees analyse the noxious effects of drugs and industrial chemicals, and teach how to avoid and treat toxicity.
Toxicology is a highly interdisciplinary field connecting knowledge from biology, chemistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, pharmacy and environmental science. In addition to a high focus on research, toxicology also focuses on risk assessment and management for consumer products, to safeguard public health. Other responsibilities may include making sure working environments are safe for employees.
Based on diverse chemical and biological aspects of substances, toxicology studies offer various specialized sub-disciplines such as neuro-toxicology, aquatic toxicology, chemical toxicology, environmental toxicology, forensic toxicology, and medical toxicology. Bachelors and Masters in Toxicology are usually offered by universities at graduate level or higher and have a high research focus.
Toxicologists are frequently employed in industry, academia and regulatory institutions in fields such as forensics, healthcare, pharmaceutical sciences, environmental health, the regulatory sector, education, and more.

Soil science studies the outer shell of the Earth in which vegetable life can develop if nutrients are present. Masters in Soil Science borrow methods and knowledge from other earth sciences, such as geology, but also from biochemistry, natural resource management and sustainable development.
Soil scientists are involved in the agricultural production, the assessment of environmental quality and product toxicity. In agriculture, they undergo research on the reaction of various types of soil to fertilizers, tillage practices, or crop rotation, and offer guidance to farmers and other landowners. Soil experts can also provide counselling for construction projects, drilling procedures and forestry companies.
A student of soil science can become an expert in the improvement and manipulation of land productivity, waste management, agro-meteorology, rehabilitation and preservation of soil, water management, and much more. Academic programmes blend an in-depth theoretical knowledge of processes and properties of the soil environment, with field surveys and lab work. Career prospects for graduates in soil science include: horticulture consultant, as well as farm manager, plant geneticist and conservation planner. Professionals also work in the landscape business, soil technical audit and in the food production industry.

Geology is a sub-field of environmental studies and earth sciences that analyses the history and physical structure of the earth, its constitutive materials and the processes shaping it. Geology studies the chemical and physical properties of earth materials including minerals, natural gases and water. It also deals with earth hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and floods.
Geologists combine applied tools from the fields of maths, physics, chemistry, or biology to study the geologic environment and its impact on human life. They often specialise in a particular geological research area such as earth processes, earth materials or earth history. Professionals also use their expertise in assessing environmental problems and identifying means and ways to solve or minimize those issues.
Academic programmes in geology present several specialization opportunities, with majors ranging from palaeontology, geological hazards, to petroleum geology, geo-informatics and economic geology. Besides theoretical knowledge, students also gain a strong understanding of field methods and data-collection practices. They interpret the results in lab sessions, use modern technology for research and improve their numeracy skills.
Graduates in geology work in a variety of settings, with the most common being industrial companies, environmental consulting firms, government agencies and non-profit organisations. Example job titles include: geo-hydrologist, engineering geologist, geophysicist, seismic interpreter, palaeontologist, petroleum geologist, etc.

Hydrology is studying the movement, distribution and quality of water on the planet, while water management is related to the development of policies and regulations. Resources and sustainability are analysed in the practical parts of a Bachelor’s degree in hydrology and water management. The discipline covers both academic study and development based on solutions. Research institutes offering prestigious Masters and Bachelors in Hydrology and Water Management are known worldwide, especially among international students.
The field of study covers subjects such as hydrogeology, marine hydrology, drainage basin management, water quality, irrigation, water conservation and water treatment. Students graduating a Master’s degree in Hydrology and Water Management closely work with environmental engineers, geologists and civil engineers.
Water management also includes treatment of drinking water, industrial water, sewage and wastewater, flood protection and the water table. Opportunities after graduation cover jobs as a group manager in a private company, university lecturer, scientists in hydrology or water resources consultant in a state agency.

Climate studies and meteorology is an interdisciplinary study that focuses on the activity and changes of the atmosphere as well as weather patterns, on the other side. The sub-disciplines of these sciences lead to specializations in observation of the elements that comprise weather and the meteorological phenomena. Together with atmospheric physics and chemistry, climate studies and meteorology are part of the atmospheric sciences.
Bachelor’s degrees in climate studies and meteorology focus on academic study and practice, thanks to analysis and research of the atmosphere. Large-scale climate and weather effects such as El Nino or global warming are also studied. Students who pursue a Master’s degree in climate studies and meteorology are able to study temperature, pressure, wind, humidity and rain, the changes in latitude, altitude or the interaction between Earth’s atmosphere and the oceans.
Climate studies and meteorology can be applied in military, energy production, agriculture, transport or constructions, among other fields, resulting in vast employment opportunities. Graduates can become weather forecasters in the public or private sector, forensic or broadcast meteorologists or even teachers.

Sustainable Development is a branch of Environmental Studies & Earth Sciences that focuses on solving issues of Ecology, Biodiversity, and Conservation, tapping into the natural resources the Earth already has and using them to their full potential.
Sustainable Development is an interdisciplinary field, which involves knowledge from Environmental Economics, Policy Making, and Resource Management. Sustainable Development is a subject that aims to limit the usage of fossil fuels and encourages the adoption of alternative renewable energy sources that can limit human impact on the environment. As a student taking a Sustainable.
Development degree, you will have to determine if a project is efficient enough or if it will just drain resources and damage the environment in the long run. Sustainable Development courses will focus on the global goals and long-term actions that can be taken to protect nature against harmful, unsustainable activities. As a sustainability consultant, you'll assess projects and offer improvement suggestions and recommendations for limiting any damaging impact on the environment. Additionally, sustainability experts also analyse aspects related to economic growth, as this is the main factor behind unsustainable practices. You'll have the opportunity to be one of the brilliant minds that comes up with revolutionary solutions to environmental problems.
A Bachelor’s or Master’s degrees in Sustainable Development covers courses and concepts connected to Sustainability Risks and Opportunities, Natural, Environmental and Social Sciences, Ecology and other subjects.
After graduation, students will find jobs in a wide range of careers, including job titles such as project manager, sustainability analyst, sustainable design professional, energy efficiency analyst, or operations manager.

Environmental economics deals with the exploitation, allocation and use of renewable and fixed natural resources. Environmental policy refers to sets of safe rules of conduct that organisations have to implement in order to address various environmental issues. Environmental economics and policy look into the economic effects of worldwide environmental policies, through theoretical and empirical study.
Environmental economics studies cost and benefits-related issues of water quality, air pollution, solid waste, global warming, and other environmental problems. Environmental policies deal with the internal and external regulations implemented by companies such as recycling of packaging materials, efficient use of water and energy or minimising waste. Masters in Environmental Economics borrow topics from other disciplines such as agribusiness, ecology, natural resource management, energy studies, sustainable development and strategic management.
Environmental economics and policy degrees teach students how to apply economic principals to real-world environmental problems. Students learn to design economic policy tools and assess their effectiveness. They will also learn how to employ cost-benefit analytical models in order to compile environmental reviews and to find the economic balance between costs and returns.
Graduates undertake careers in the private sector, in public agencies and in non-profit organisations. Professionals practice in fields such as agricultural economy, environmental consulting, project management, resources policy advocacy, resources administration or environmental audit assessments.

Environmental management deals with the regulation process and protection of the health of our planet, by promoting human behaviours that make a positive impact on the natural environment. Professionals in the field investigate problems, develop solutions, and work in teams to address various types of environmental crises throughout the world. Environmental management addresses hot topic issues such as global warming, pollution, deforestation, soil erosion, landfills, or depletion of Earth's natural resources.
Environmental management study programmes are usually offered at the postgraduate level, but courses at undergraduate level deal with concepts related to this discipline, including Bachelors (B.A. and B.Sc.) in resource management, geography, environmental science, and more. Programme curriculums focus on the relationships between science, management, and policy, while providing scientific understanding of ecological and social systems, applicable in a management or policy-making context.
Students of environmental management learn how to assess, manage and monitor the environmental effects of organisations, participate in multidisciplinary project work, as well as develop critical thinking, problem solving and research skills. Most programmes include practical experience through fieldwork and project-oriented group-work, dealing with common real-life issues.
Employment opportunities in the field include working for consultancies, local authorities, utilities providers (such as water, electricity and gas), and organisations within the voluntary sector. Public and private organisations are also looking for competent personnel capable of operating environmental management systems that comply with national and international legislation.

Natural resource management focuses on the need of sustainable management of the Earth's depleting natural resources such as clean water, energy, minerals and biological resources, in relation to the growth of the human population. To answer these pressing issues, professionals need to be able to work in interdisciplinary teams and apply scientific, ecological, economic and social knowledge to come up with holistic solutions.
Study programmes in natural resource management offer science-based core curricula in fields such as biology, resource geology, geography, or social sciences. Courses and specialisations focus on environmental topics like land-use planning, conservation biology, energy use, climate change, renewable resource management, forest and wildlife management, or natural resource policy.
Classes include lectures from leading experts, computer labs, tutorials, as well as relevant fieldwork. Graduates are trained to be able to maintain a dialogue with diverse parties involved in natural resource initiatives. By understanding complex issues, resource managers are involved in implementing sustainable solutions to environmental problems, educating the public, while understanding connections between society and biological systems.
Graduates can find work as consultants or staff in a range of companies and government agencies. They can pursue careers in sustainability planning, environmental project management, wildlife conservation, natural conservation management, natural park management, wildlife biology, fertilizer sales, and more.

Ecology is a bio-science that studies the interaction between organisms, plants and the environment in which they live, both biotic and abiotic. It analyses the structure, function and productivity of the supra-individual bio-systems, the populations and the mixed systems, known as the ecosystems. It also deals with environment protection, animal and vegetal biodiversity, genetic diversity, agriculture, and water purification or climate-change concerns.
Ecologists are mostly engaged in research, they analyse acquired data and provide reports about environmental issues. Professionals typically specialise in one ecological area such as aquatic ecology, biodiversity and taxonomy, conservation biology among others.
Ecology is mainly a descriptive and experimental science and it utilises methods from other disciplines including math, statistics, physiology and geology. Study programmes blend lectures with field practice, data collection, and lab research. Students assimilate core principals of environmental systems and learn how to apply them to real-world management issues, particularly in the conservation field and in the assessment of human impact in the natural world.
Graduates specialising in ecology practice in governmental agencies, in the private sector or in non-profit organisations. As environmental awareness is globally growing, the offer of "green jobs" is also increasing. Careers prospects include zoologist, conservancy officer, molecular biologist, laboratory manager or environmental consultant.

Environmental Sciences is a field that studies the natural processes, their causes and effects. It involves both field work, lab research and testing. This means that theoretical and practical aspects will blend together perfectly in order to draw conclusions and find solutions.
Due to its object of study, Environmental Sciences is a very interdisciplinary subject. Expect to gain knowledge from Biology, Ecology, Geosciences, Chemistry, Physics, Social Sciences and others. You’ll have the opportunity to study various types of climates and explore different habitats all over the world.
You’ll be able to apply your findings to create policies that will contribute to the protection of the environment. These policies can help with ongoing natural problems, such as global warming, desertification, the melting of the polar ice caps, and the pollution of air, land, and water. Additionally, you can use your expertise to assess the impact of human activities on nature and the eco-friendliness of projects.
A Bachelor’s or Master’s in Environmental Sciences can lead to a successful career as an: environmental consultant, environmental education officer, environmental engineer, marine biologist, sustainability consultant, water quality scientist and many other responsibilities.


... Master’s degrees in Sports Management, Hospitability Management, Culinary Arts, Event Management, and Tourism & Leisure. You should choose one of these disciplines if you love socialising, traveling, preparing tasty dishes, planning events, or managing sport teams or businesses.
Hospitality, Leisure & Sports has been growing in popularity because it helps students transform their passions into successful careers.
Courses in Hospitality, Leisure & Sports focus on different goals. You can either learn how to become an excellent chef, make sure events are well organised, learn how to cater to the needs of tourists and make sure they have a great experience, or discover how to manage sports teams and other departments within the industry.
During classes, you’ll develop skills such as people and business management, planning and organising, marketing, as well as communication and cooperation. These will be useful especially if you’ll work in a multicultural environment.
Studying Hospitality, Leisure & Sports is a great experience, especially if you like interacting and helping people. You might help couples find the perfect honeymoon destination, or make sure that guests in your hotel always leave 5-star reviews. If you’re passionate about cities and architecture, be that guide who answers every question on the tour and knows the best places to eat and take one-of-a-kind photos.
People who graduate Hospitality, Leisure & Sports choose careers such as: travel agent, hotel and resort staff, tour guide, restaurant manager, athletic director, personal chef, and others.

Sports management includes business activities such as planning, organising, directing, controlling, budgeting, and evaluating in contexts related to different types of professional sports and physical activities. Masters in sports management build the necessary skills for managing a sports team, or the business side of a sports club in order to generate revenue.
Among their future responsibilities, students should expect to gain professional expertise necessary to lead and promote sports organisations, to manage arenas and stadiums, and organise entertainment sport events.
Sports management degrees touch upon subjects like: sport facility management, athletic recruitment, sport governance, leadership and personnel management, sports marketing, sponsorship and sales.
By studying sports management, future professionals achieve skills on how to promote as well as motivate teams aiming to achieve high performance. Sports managers develop skills on how to define sports clubs management objectives based on thorough analysis of demand and supply, covering the full range of issues regarding customers, competitors, rewards system, staff evaluation and integration. Sports managers have to provide continuous training and improvement of team members/employees to achieve strategic and operational objectives.
Graduates usually find jobs in areas like: professional, collegiate, and amateur sport organisations, as well as in corporate sports firms and non-profit organisations.

Hospitality management focuses on ensuring customer safety and comfort in a hotel, restaurant or entertainment facility. Hospitality management centres on customer satisfaction that would lead to his loyalty and repeated business. Students in hospitality management usually have the opportunity to receive hands-on experience in real hospitality organisations. Hospitality management integrates theories from similar disciplines like: commerce, business administration and supply chain management and logistics.
Main topics offered by programmes in hospitality management cover: hotel operation, hospitality management communication, catering and banquet management, applied foodservice sanitation, hotel and restaurant financial management, travel and tour operation.
Students in hospitality management will be equipped with the skills necessary to implement business development and quality management strategies. They will gain basic administrative abilities in order to control organisation, planning and scheduling activities. Most importantly, students will develop excellent customer service and communication skills as working in hospitality facility involves establishing and maintaining positive working relationships with colleagues and clients.
Graduates apply for employment in restaurants, hotels, casinos, clubs, and contract food services. They find jobs as hotel managers, travel agents, clerks, cost controllers, restaurant managers or cruise line personnel.

Event management focuses on the steps and techniques that have to be taken for the successful organisation of an event. The event management discipline offers knowledge on how to build a concept, plan and identify the target audience for the desired event. Professionals in the field have to take into consideration budgeting, developing a theme, making sure all equipment and facilities are according to the desires of the client. Event management programmes offer a mix of business and management knowledge, including education on creativity and design elements.
Event management borrows theories and practical knowledge from similar disciplines such as: innovation management, project management, marketing and public relations.
Subjects included in the events management curricula include: strategic management, innovation for events, advertising and promotion, effective messaging, and event business.
Programmes in event management will equip students with creative thinking and strong leadership skills in order to coordinate teams that come together to accomplish a successful event. They will develop excellent organisational abilities, attention to detail and they will learn how to communicate efficiently and clearly, as they have to maintain a constant feedback between beneficiaries and services contractors.
Career prospects for graduates include areas like: exhibit and conference organising, event designing, wedding planning, public relations, and more.

Sports sciences study human movement and exercise and the health benefits that arise from practising physical activity. The study of sports sciences integrates theoretical knowledge about the structures and mechanisms of the human body, nutrition, and technical education on optimising performance. Programmes in sports sciences are conducted through lectures and seminars, but students are engaged in practical sessions in different sport facilities like: courts, sport fields, gyms and swimming pools.
Topics of courses in sports sciences include: exercise and sports physiology, biomechanics, motor control and learning, strength and conditioning, basic human anatomy and physiology, principles of human nutrition.
The sports sciences discipline will equip students with general knowledge of training, injury prevention and technique analysis required for preparing professional athletes. They will acquire abilities to plan, design and execute practical activities using appropriate techniques and procedures. Sports scientists are also able to make correlations between different physical activities and biological human structure and function.
Career opportunities for graduates include jobs like: physical education teacher, nutritionist, performance analyst, sports coach/therapist, fitness centre manager, strength and conditioning specialist.

Tourism and leisure includes all the economic and social activities associated with travelling experiences, recreation and the enjoyment of free time. Professionals in the field have the responsibility to maximize their clients' leisure experience, either through direct contact, or by efficiently managing the logistics and personnel involved in the leisure resorts or activities. They work in tourism and the travel industry, in organising various events or in sports and health centres.
Tourism and leisure professionals have a good understanding of sales principles, excellent communication skills and usually speak more than one foreign language. Most are also trained in events, hospitality or sports management, and even in business administration.
Combining the art of relaxation with the competencies needed to manage the tourist industry, tourism is a popular applied science profession. Typically, academic degrees in tourism, hospitality and leisure offer in depth management understanding, implementation strategies and even different languages. Examples of study programmes include: international tourism management and consultancy, attractions and theme parks management and leisure and event planning.
Some of the most popular careers in tourism and leisure include job titles such as travel agent, fitness instructor, hotel and resort staff or tour guide; opportunities stretch as far as restaurant management or transportation professional. A career in tourism requires people-oriented skills above any task related technical competencies.

Culinary arts study specific cooking methods and techniques in order to present healthy, tasty, unique and aesthetic dishes worthy of restaurant quality. The culinary arts discipline combines knowledge of business and management with skills in cooking, art and presentation. Students in culinary arts programmes will get the chance to experience working in a kitchen environment and may take part in internships with local restaurants.
Culinary arts degrees offer relevant information on: food safety, commercial food production, new world flavours, menu planning, kitchen management, vegetarian cuisine, pastries and deserts cooking.
Students will gain skills in preparing dishes using sanitary and nutritious ingredients while also paying attention to the overall design of a meal. Culinary professionals will apply sanitation principles in food preparation and will be able to prepare a variety of meal, bakery and pastries products. They will also develop abilities in planning a menu and will be prepared for the rigors of working in a commercial kitchen. Culinary artists must keep up to date with modern innovations and the latest in global cuisine.
Graduates usually engage in jobs like: restaurant manager, food and beverage controller, food writer/ critic.


... understanding the laws governing the natural world. People who choose to study Natural Sciences have a large number of subdisciplines to choose from, such as: Applied Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Neuroscience, Physics, Statistics, and others.
These subdisciplines are categorised as either Life Sciences, including Ecology, Anatomy, and Botany; or Physical Sciences, such as Physics, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, or Chemistry. During courses, you will focus on learning principles you can make use of in interdisciplinary contexts, which you can then apply in your research, analytical, or laboratory work. You will develop your problem-solving skills, as well as the ability to conduct experiments, synthesise information, and draw conclusions.
Most of the major discoveries that have changed our world were made by people passionate about exact sciences. For others, your work might be just a bunch of numbers, formulas or some principles that are hard to understand. But you know that your work is used in various fields, and many of the commodities we enjoy today (e.g. electricity, warmth, trading, shelter) wouldn’t be possible without science. The breakthroughs of the future will be made by people like you, and by studying Natural Sciences you can join the ranks of the most brilliant minds that changed the world with their genius.
A Bachelor's or Master's degree in Natural Sciences & Mathematics allows you to find work in interesting domains, such as Statistics, Game Theory, Cryptography, Finance, Economics, Philosophy, etc.

Physics focuses on research and it is one of the oldest academic disciplines that are taught throughout different stages of education. The field primarily focuses on classical, relativistic and quantum mechanics and the on the quantum field theory. Physics degrees focus on explaining the phenomena people observe and experience and, through its discoveries, it has strong influences on mathematics, philosophy, geology and engineering. Humanity owes some of the greatest discoveries of modern society to developments in the field of physics, leading to the creation of lasers, TV, radio, computers, DNA, or nuclear science.
Also known as “the knowledge of nature”, the study of physics makes a significant difference through contributions in technology and theoretical breakthroughs. A Bachelor’s degree in physics includes the study of atoms, condensed matter, optics, astrophysics and many others. Master’s degrees in physics, concentrate more on research and lab experiments, helping students develop essential analytical, problem solving and communication skills.
Strongly connected to mathematics, physics is a field that brings inviting career prospects for those who wish to become lecturers, geophysicists, meteorologists, patent attorneys, researchers or even work for the government.

Mathematics studies numbers, structure and change and draws its origins from early philosophy. This ancient discipline is commonly used for calculations, counting and measurements. However, mathematics is a complex field which also involves theories, discovery of patterns, development of law, nicknamed of “The queen of sciences” .
Throughout history, a significant amount of mathematicians such as Galileo Galilei, Albert Einstein, Pythagoras, Archimedes and many others brought innovations in mathematics and gave birth to new theories and solutions to analytical problems. Mathematical principles can also be found in disciplines such as medicine, natural sciences, engineering, finance and social sciences.
Students who hold a Bachelor’s degree in mathematics can turn to applied mathematics, statistics, physics or engineering, if they wish to continue their studies. Such a programme develops skills such as knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry and strong deductive reasoning. After graduating a Master’s degree in mathematics, students have the choice to be employed as operational researchers, statisticians, aerospace engineers, accountants, software testers or teachers.

Chemistry is the science that covers composition, properties, structure and reactions of molecules, atoms and systems that include the two. Chemistry originated from the medieval art of alchemy, which sought to create gold through various transformations of materials. However, these experiments resulted in other scientific discoveries that created the basis for modern chemistry.
Chemistry is strongly connected to physics, but it differs because chemical analysis is made at an atomic level and substances change their structure, shape or state. All this study is done with the purpose of understanding the origin of the substance. Chemistry is divided into materials science, quantum, organic, and inorganic chemistry. Students who earn a Master degree in Chemistry (Master of Science) can specialize in kinetics, combinatorial chemistry, cluster chemistry, photochemistry, theoretical chemistry and more.
Pursuing a Master’s degree in Chemistry leads to careers in research and science in disciplines such as chemical engineering, pharmaceutics, or the public sector. Some of the highest paid career prospects are as analytical chemists, engineers, healthcare scientists, toxicologists or research scientists.

Applied mathematics is an interdisciplinary field that deals with the application of mathematics to practical problems in physical sciences, social sciences, technology, engineering or business. Applied mathematics can include different mathematical branches such as mathematics of engineering, linear programming, continuous modelling, numerical analysis, statistics, information theory, game theory, etc.
Applied mathematics degrees involve both in-depth mathematical understanding and basic knowledge of other subjects, depending on the chosen area of expertise. Colleges and universities offer a great number of specialisations: mathematical biology, combinatorics, mathematical finance, applied analysis, topography, computational neuroscience, probability, risk and statistics, and many more.
Besides mathematical knowledge and analytical reasoning, students will need knowledge of problem-formulation and problem-solving techniques, good work management skills, a high capacity to conceptualise and to communicate results and arguments.
Graduates of Bachelors or Masters in Applied Mathematics have the opportunity to develop careers in many fields and working environments including education and academic research, technology services or the pharmaceutics industry. They can also work in engineering, programming, finance, business, or they can provide services for non-profit organizations, corporations or governmental institutions.

Biology is a natural science, together with chemistry and physics, and it is taught in schools of all levels. This field explores all living and non-living forms of life, from microorganisms to plants, animals and humans. Biology sub-disciplines focus on species and groups of organisms and offer an in-depth study of their growth and evolution, origin, actions and distribution around the world.
Zoology, biophysics, anthropology, histology and ecology are only some of the specializations that students choose for a Master’s degree in biology. Others may enrol in a degree programme that focuses on the foundations of modern biology, such as cell theory, evolution, genetics, homeostasis and energy. While classic biology had the cell as a centre point, today the focus of attention is on energy, as a mechanism of survival for organisms.
Graduates of a Master degree in biology enter a competitive employment market, where practical experience plays a major role. They are able to find jobs as higher education lecturers, pharmacologists, research scientists or science writers.

Astronomy is the natural science that studies celestial bodies, the forces developed in their interaction in space and other observable phenomena. Space sciences include other areas of investigation such as space travel and space exploration, in addition to astronomy. Astronomers observe the birth, evolution, extinction and movement of objects in space, such as planets and stars, solar systems and galaxies, asteroids and comets, and black holes. Professionals try to predict future outcomes in the life of the universe, and they try to formulate clear theories about the past and origin of the cosmos. Astronomy and space sciences are closely related to astrophysics, aerospace engineering, astronautics, and it often involves knowledge from chemistry, mathematics, and statistics.
Bachelors and Masters in Astronomy blend theoretical lectures in mathematics and astrophysics, with observatory practices, computer programming and simulations. Space studies deliver knowledge regarding space sciences, management, operations and economy. Students deal with subjects covering the mechanics behind space stations, satellites, space crafts and transportation systems.
Many astronomy graduates choose to continue their studies in research, in a specialised area of astronomy. Career prospects include traditional positions such as scientist, technician, engineer, astronomer, or manager within an observatory or an institute.

Biotechnology refers to various techniques and technologies used in the bio-industrial production or bio-genetic controlled processes involving vegetal, animal or human organisms. Genetic manipulation is the most common form of using living organisms and bimolecular processes for the creation or modification of the physical properties of various types of products. Example of biotech products or practices include antibiotics, biofuels and genetically modified foods. An important medical application of biotechnology includes genetic processes that lead to organ regeneration.
Biotechnology contributes to developments in areas like agriculture, food production and security, climate control and medicine. Biotechnology can also help with solving some of the most pressing environmental issues, like oil spills, pesticide side effects or polluted water, contributing to the health of the natural environment. Masters in Biotechnology include blended curricula with a mixture of lectures in biology, chemistry and mathematics, combined with laboratory work, computer applications and research and even ethical case studies. Biotechnology degrees provide solid grounding in biochemistry, molecular biology, genomic, bioinformatics, drug design and development, nanotechnology or innovation management, as well as in-depth IT skills.
Biotechnology graduates develop careers in a wide range of fields such as the chemical, pharmaceutical, food and environmental industries, in genetics and regenerative medicine, in process control, or in research and development. Example roles include bio-informatician, biophysicist, quality control analyst, biomedical engineer, pharmaceutical sales representative, or crime lab technician.

Natural sciences form the basis for applied science subjects and focus on the study of the universe and the rules of nature. Biology, chemistry and physics are among the major study areas of the discipline, but study fields such as biochemistry and geophysics are also considered natural sciences. Sub-disciplines also include earth science, astronomy, behavioural science, anthropology, geology and others.
Due to their high interdisciplinary structure, natural sciences degrees will be especially appealing to students interested in studying science, while keeping their study options open. Natural sciences graduates benefit from a broad range of general scientific knowledge, as well as skills in communication, numeracy and information technology. They will also be able to solve complex problems and make best use of personal and material resources available.
Bachelors and Masters related to natural sciences will place a strong emphasis on the practical application of theoretical knowledge and will include specialised laboratories. Some natural sciences programmes also focus on solving global and local environmental issues to contribute to a healthier population.
Graduates are well qualified for a wide variety of scientific careers such as research and development, marketing and management in biotechnology. Students can find jobs as environmental engineers, actuarial technicians, landscape architects, commercial food trainees and more.

Microbiology is the science that deals with the study of microorganisms and the effects of diseases that microorganisms produce. Microbiology degrees study the shape, structure (morphology), genetic and metabolic processes in microscopic and sub-microscopic organisms.
The science of microbiology is relatively young and it offers practical applications for different areas of human activity: medicine, agriculture, nutrition, biotechnology and more. Theoretical and practical accumulation of nuclear physics, cellular and molecular biology, and information techniques have led to the improvement of microbiology logistics, resulting in the rapid development of microbiology as a multilateral science. Studying microbiology touches upon elements of other disciplines like chemistry, biomedicine, public health, environmental impacts and human health.
Two main branches of microbiology are bacteriology and virology (which deals with the study of viruses and diseases), while other sub-disciplines include: immunology, biotechnology, industrial microbiology, public health microbiology, environment microbiology and genetic engineering ? one of the most dynamic fields of modern microbiology.
Students will have the chance to study topics such as: genetics of microbiology, general virology, microbial pathogens, infectious diseases, general parasitology and microbial ecology. Appart from understanding scientific processes and methods, students will develop skills in using and interpreting statistics and will be able critically analyse information. A microbiology graduate may benefit from various career opportunities, working as a biomedical scientist, microbiologist, scientific laboratory technician, forensic scientist, science advisor, administrator, researcher, or science writer.

Molecular sciences is a cross-disciplinary field that studies molecular materials, structures and systems and their application to real-word problems. Molecular sciences serve as a basis for other scientific areas such as medicine and pharmacology, bio-molecular engineering, ecology and environmental sciences, neurobiology, materials and chemical engineering. Masters in Molecular Sciences also involve aspects of scientific innovation and discovery, ethics and environmental sustainability.
Specialised courses in molecular sciences are based on the main focus areas of biology, chemistry, physics and technology. Classes may include topics such as: molecular biology, molecular life sciences, biomedical and molecular sciences, chemical and molecular sciences, molecular health sciences, molecular science and technology, or molecular science and engineering.
Students in molecular sciences also have a significant study choice when it comes to academic specialisations, since each university will advance their own set of research areas. Examples of specialisations include: design and synthesis of molecular structures, biological chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology, materials and food chemistry, biomedicine and biomelocular interactions, clinical molecular genetics, environmental biology, etc.
Professionals typically work in medicine and medical engineering, pharmaceuticals industry, cosmetics, agriculture and forestry, forensic sciences, scientific consultancy. Many welcome the possibilities to gradually advance in management positions, while others continue their research as senior scientists.

Neuroscience is a sub-field of biology that specialises in the study of the nervous system structure, evolution and function. Neural science is constantly developing, but it can be divided into the branches of cognitive, clinical, computational and developmental neuroscience. Being an interdisciplinary science, it is closely related to other disciplines such as medicine, chemistry, physics, linguistics, computer science, engineering, and philosophy.
Neuroscientists focus on studying the cellular and operational levels of the nervous system, and on how these affect behavioural patterns. They also conduct laboratory experiments and theoretical research using specialised tools, techniques and computer simulations.
Most universities offer an interdisciplinary foundation compiling basic knowledge in natural sciences, mathematics, computer science, psychology and others. With this fundamental understanding, students will be equipped to investigate the nervous system with its microscopic structure and biologic processes, leading to the design of artificial intelligence systems. Specialisations in neuroscience include: affective neuroscience, cognitive and behavioural neuroscience, molecular neuroscience, neuroimaging, neurophysiology, neuro-linguistics, social neuroscience, etc.
Graduates can work in the pharmaceutical industry, health agencies, companies that deal with information and communication science, management structures in public health. Traditional neuroscience careers include neurologist, neuroanatomist, neurological surgeon, neuro-pharmacologist, psychiatrist or electro-neuro-diagnostic technician.

Statistics comprises of a set of mathematical techniques that help in analysing collected data. Professionals use statistical thinking, parameters and methods to explain results and to anticipate possible outcomes in diverse scientific, social and business issues. Therefore, statistics is a valuable tool used in other disciplines such as medicine, natural sciences, sociology, economics, engineering and marketing. Statisticians gather data, summarise information, draw conclusions and advance predictions.
Universities offer mathematical programmes with specialisation in statistics, usually at the undergraduate level, or highly specialised degrees in statistics at the graduate level. Specialisations of statistics degrees include: statistics and measurement, statistical inference, econometrics, quantitative methods of the financial markets, statistics in life sciences, computational finance, biostatistics. Applicants are typically required to have excellent grades in mathematics and at least one other science subject. Students and professionals will use computer literacy and transferable abilities such as analytical skills, a sound logic, the capacity to interpret vast amounts of information and to effectively communicate results.
Graduates in statistics can easily find jobs wherever there is the need for decision-making based on data. They can become business analysts, economists, mathematicians, data analysts, risk analysts, environmental scientists and may naturally advance in managerial positions. Professionals work in various industries, such as medicine, health care and pharmaceuticals, marketing research, public administration, sociology, business, or insurance.


... all aspects of the human condition. You will have the opportunity to study speech, the development of ideas and knowledge, how society functions, behaviour patterns and challenges, historical and cultural events, as well as human interactions and relationships. Humanities is a great degree programme for people who are curious about humanity and the development of culture and society throughout the ages.
Here are some popular courses you can take during a Bachelor's or Master's degree in Humanities: Anthropology, Foreign Languages, Psychology, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Ethics, Modern or Ancient Philosophy, and others.
Students of Humanities learn how to think critically and creatively. They are encouraged to ask questions and come up with their own interpretation. Degree courses also focus on individual research work, while developing interpretation and writing skills. Cultivating the ability to learn how to learn is also an essential aspect of studying a degree in Humanities.
Get ready to explore the art, discoveries, rituals, traditions, and cultures that humans have invented over time. By studying Humanities, you will get a record of human experience, a source of infinite potential.
Here are some of the most popular jobs chosen by Humanities graduates: teacher, counsellor, technical writer, editor, genealogist, and linguist.

History is the science concerned with finding, gathering, structuring and passing on facts about events in the past. It aims at objectively establishing a cause-effect explanation of events in a chronological, complete and truthful manner. The study of history helps everyone understand why human society is the way it is today, why there are differences between societies and how people have evolved over time. A good understanding of the past leads to better decisions in the present and better planning for the future. Although history is regarded as a descriptive science of the past, it has great impact on the present.
A student with a Master’s degree in history will learn how to assess evidence of various types, how to interpret conflict in an objective, based manner and how to explain past changes. History studies offer flexibility, help students develop good analytical skills, the capacity to identify, analyse and explain trends and behaviours and great research skills. All the attributes above are vital, especially for students with a Bachelor’s degree in history, who can find employment as historic buildings/conservation officers, museum/gallery curators, archaeologists, broadcast journalists or academic librarians.

Ancient history studies society, culture, politics and the intellectual world of old civilisations such as Egypt, Greece or Rome. The ancient history discipline provides information about the history and society of antiquity, from the beginnings of the classical civilization to the fall of the Roman Empire.
Ancient history is connected to similar disciplines such as anthropology, cultural studies and philosophy. Ancient history degrees offer students information on such topics as: Egyptian language, ancient world at war, Egyptian religion, Roman revolution, archaeology and artefact studies, ancient and early Christianity. Students will understand the relationships and connections between ancient world civilisations and the influence they had on later periods in history, as well as their relevance to our present society.
Students of ancient history courses develop skills in conducting research, developing historical theories, and presenting their discoveries. They will get in-depth knowledge of a variety of critical approaches to ancient history methodological questions and issues. Programmes in ancient history also equip students with abilities to analyse and summarise content, critically evaluate resources and build relevant arguments in verbal and written communication.
Graduates have moved on to careers in journalism, teaching, public relations, marketing and human resources.

Modern history examines the social, political and economic facts in the modern contemporary world. The discipline focuses on main concepts and notions of political history, social and cultural development in the world, in the period between the seventeenth and the twentieth century. Modern history courses analyse events such as revolutions, ideology, nation states, modern war, globalisation, political regimes, capitalism, totalitarianism, democracy, and communism. The field of modern history incorporates principles from philosophy, international law and sociology.
Curriculums in modern history touch upon subjects like the crisis of the world, the rise of national industrial empires, Christianity and sexual revolution, democracy and governance, classical political thought, international study in peace and conflict, the world at the beginning of the twentieth century.
Students learn to conduct historical inquiries, argument ideas in a concise manner. During this process, they will gain the ability to express their ideas clearly in both verbal and written form. Modern history experts are able to organise information resources in a logical and coherent way and to draw conclusions based on a responsible and thorough research. Career path for modern history graduates includes many domains such as: politics, publishing, journalism, media, business and commerce, public sector administration.

Language studies look into multiple issues related to the use of language, such as how language can be learnt, how language is composed (letters, syllables, words, sentences), and how grammatical and structural aspects work together to create meaning and logic.
Subjects included by courses in language studies include topics such as evolutionary linguistics, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, neuro-linguistics, language acquisition and discourse analysis. Literature studies also feature an important research component in further understanding and developing human knowledge of linguistics. Supportive disciplines in the field include anthropology, human anatomy, informatics, philosophy, sociology, psychology as well as education.
Students learn about concepts such as phonology, syntax, semantics, or phonetic analysis. They get a chance to become aware of the linguistic subtleties of poetry, may focus on pronunciation and sentence fluency, and learn the historical and development of language studies.
Students will acquire excellent oral and written communication skills. They will also become proficient in data analysis, as well as gathering and interpreting information. Language studies specialists will develop rhetorical abilities and will be able to make detailed research on any topic regarding the area of language.
Graduates usually pursue careers like: interpreter, journalist, translator, language researcher or teacher.

Language studies aim at preparing students to build a deep understanding of a culture based on its individual language and literature, using the spoken and written forms of expression. Gaining in-depth knowledge of a foreign language helps students understand and value cultural diversity, helps build connections between societies, and makes the world a smaller, more open place to live in.
Courses explore a wide range of fields including: literature, film, critical theory, philosophy, linguistics, politics and ethics, etc. Students who want to learn a foreign language may find short-courses, summer courses as well as advanced undergraduate and postgraduate language programmes. They may choose to study a popular international language such as English, French, German or Spanish, to use in international professional contexts. Alternatively, they may learn a less-known foreign language, or an old language gaining a good entry into a specialised field of work such as translations, interpreting, business or archaeology. Examples include Chinese, Arabic, Latin, Sanskrit or ancient Greek. Students of languages are able to speak, write, listen and read in one or more foreign languages at an advanced level. Speaking and learning a foreign language enhances creativity, memory and problem-solving skills. Languages graduates can find jobs in many areas working as: translators, teachers, linguists, international relations consultant, historians, research and more.

Philosophy and ethics aims to look into the human problems related to existence, knowledge and moral values that govern a person's behaviour. These problems are considered based on rational argumentation using systematic approaches. Philosophy strives to acquire knowledge by rational means about the issues that are difficult for empirical investigations. This study field has three main sub-fields: natural philosophy, moral philosophy and metaphysical philosophy.
Philosophy degrees cover many other branches including epistemology, logic, metaphysics, aesthetics, and philosophy of language, philosophy of law, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of science.
Ethics is the part of philosophy that analyses fundamental values and systems of moral principles that define good human conduct. The discipline is usually divided into: applied ethics (how people should behave), normative ethics (what moral principles should be used) and meta-ethics (studying the nature of moral facts). Ethics touches real-word contexts and is involved in the right conduct of many professional activities such as medical ethics, environmental ethics and business ethics

Religious studies and theology focus on the supernatural, sacred or divine and the moral code, ritual practices, dogmas, values or associated institutions. Religion has several functions that are expressed through the human behaviour: cognitive or action function, anxiety reduction, social function, compensation and identity. This interdisciplinary field studies the impact of religion in the international environment and the presence of traditions in the modern world. Research focuses on different approaches on religions and its place in history.
Religious studies and theology are concerned with the study of the spiritual beliefs and their particular characteristics and their expression in nowadays society. A Bachelor’s degree in religious studies and theology can specialize in culture, conflict, librarianship, economics, geography, history and others.
The study of one or several religions equips the graduate of a Master’s degree in religious studies and theology with skills and knowledge that may lead to a career as a priest/minister, teacher/lecturer, advice worker, community development worker and others.

Literature is an art or artistic creation that uses means of expression through language. Language and literature are expression tools that offer insight into the elements that form a culture, the particular characteristics of a society or social group in terms of spirituality, intellect, emotion and physical environment. The literature discipline explores the interrelations of literature with other kinds of cultural objects, such as films, digital media and the visual arts.
Disciplines similar to literature are history, languages and philosophy. Main subjects of courses in literature include: cultural and literature, topics in literary research, reading fiction, poetry, modern drama, classical literature, women's literature.
Apart from advanced knowledge of literary studies, students will expand their creativity and communication skills. The study of literature provides general knowledge in many fields of interest, enabling analytical thinking of students and developing their ability to make solid arguments on any given subject. Literature graduates will become critical readers and writers and will gain academic skills to conduct original research in the field of literary studies.
Graduates can find jobs in a variety of fields working as: editors, teachers, writers, book reviewers / journalists, historians and researchers.

General studies or classic studies usually refer to flexible programmes offered to students who intend to design unique study plans that fit their particular academic interests. This is especially useful for students who have left college at some point in the past and wish to complete their degrees.
General studies degrees are considered interdisciplinary as students have a high degree of freedom in choosing their preferred courses. Such degrees are usually offered by colleges and universities at Bachelor's level in order to facilitate the transition of students to advanced graduate programmes. Students usually choose a desired major and may select to pursue additional concentrations and study options.
Courses usually include a wide range of topics belonging to humanities, arts and sciences including fields such as business, education, law, government, healthcare, real estate, social services, and more. Some general studies degrees are also available online to suit the needs of working adults.
General studies graduates go on to study advanced programmes in anthropology, divinity studies, education, fine arts, international affairs, library science, management, nursing, public health, and more, or choose careers related to their pursued interests.

Creative writing focuses on learning original writing techniques in order to effectively reveal the artistic expressions and inner feelings of the author and convey the intended message to the reader. Creative writing educates students on basic elements of fiction, as well as the importance of character, scene and plot. Creative writing is strongly connected with the disciplines of literature, philosophy and communications.
Creative writing can be separated in sub-disciplines like screen writing, playwriting, poetry, songs, memoirs, and more.
Students of creative writing programmes will get the chance to gain insight into writing standards and conventions. They will learn how to read and understand an essay, as well as how to use source material for writing original content. In addition, future creative writers will develop their skills in expressing creatively, develop their art of characterisation, and discover the secrets of writing a successful short story.
Programmes in creative writing also help students to develop their individual writing and self-editing skills for any form of writing creation and to obtain an understanding of the history of fiction and non-fiction writing. Creative writing helps students expand imagination, creativity, originality and written communication skills. Graduates can find jobs in the field as fiction writers, play writers, screenwriters, song writers (lyricists), columnists, bloggers, and more.

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